my first garden... ivy?!?!

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my first garden... ivy?!?!

Postby kingston » Tue Jul 05, 2005 8:28 pm

we've recently moved from a flat to our first house & garden - so i have a lot to learn about gardening!! please pardon my lack of knowledge...

due to my husband & i suffering terrible plant allergies i completely stripped away the ivy that was smothering our side of the neighbours' fence - this revealed two things: 1) that the ivy belonged to the neighbours and 2) the fence had broken away from its support posts & slid onto our land over time. the neighbours have at least made a show of appearing to act responsibly by seeking a quote to replace the fence - fingers crossed, they will follow this up

unfortunately my pruning resulted in much of the ivy dying on the neighbours' side - which i was unaware of until she started throwing branches of (her) dead ivy over the fence into our garden every day, i would imagine, to make a point - much in the same way as a cat leaves an unpleasant "message" in your path to illustrate its disdain at one's behaviour...
events came to a head when she came marching out into the street one day to shout at me for killing "all" her roses aswell and causing her to be "heartbroken'!! (interestingly, though, as i look out of the window this evening the roses seem to be alive & well!)

i was of course apologetic even though, strictly speaking, we are perfectly entitled to do as we please within our own garden as far as trimming to the boundary line is concerned, including roots & whatever the consequences might be - but i have no wish to upset anyone. we have hopefully now made amends - i even bought her a pretty potted plant as a token neighbourly gesture!

so my question - finally! - is; what can i do to prevent the ivy growing back so vigorously on our side?

i would prefer not to resort to any un-neighbourly tactics such as quietly poisoning the roots under cover of darkness, but from the amount of elbow grease it took to get the ivy off the fence, it seems like an incredibly invasive and almost unstoppable plant!
kingston
 
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Postby Rox » Tue Jul 05, 2005 8:48 pm

Dear Kingston,
The best, although back breaking, solution is to dig it out as far as you can and then put someting like 'Root Out' on it. Keep your eyes peeled for any new shoots and whip em out quick before they can get a hold.

It is nightmare stuff, we moved here 8 years ago and it was all over the front wall of the bungalow, causing damp inside. I am still finding new bits coming up between my plants!
Good Luck
Rox.
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Postby despair » Thu Jul 14, 2005 11:32 pm

Since it would have been the ivy which damaged your neighbours fence in the first place she needs educating that if she continues to grow it then another new fence will be needed PDQ

Cut off every single piece and root that gets your side and dab some creosote on the cut surface ..........that will do it

Offer to creosote/preserve your side of her new fence too !!!!!!!!

New creosote comes in light or dark brown

cover up your own plants but be very liberal with it near her roots
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Postby chameleon » Fri Jul 15, 2005 9:43 am

Residents and traders are being reminded of a new law which bans the sale to consumers of the wood preservative creosote, prohibits the amateur use of creosote products and restricts the supply and use of creosote treated wood.

This means that as of 30th April 2003, it is illegal for retailers to sell creosote to the general public. From 30th June 2003, it has become illegal for the general public to use wood preservatives that contain creosote or coal tar creosote.

The ban came into force at the end of June in line with new legislation being implemented throughout Europe following recent scientific research, which concludes that creosote has a greater potential to cause harm, and in particular cancer, than previously thought.

The results of this research were based on a lifetime's daily skin contact with creosote and it is therefore highly unlikely that the occasional contact with creosote will be of significant concern. The action has been taken as a precautionary measure only.
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Postby kingston » Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:05 am

thanks despair - the neighbour seems very keen on growing the ivy back again... ah well, if the new fence falls to disrepair again, she will have to replace it again! but i will do as you've suggested & offer to wood-preserve the fence on our side if they dont do it themselves. erm... if i dab some on the cut surfaces of the ivy will this simply stump the growth or will it eventually poison the whole lot...?
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Postby kingston » Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:09 am

hi chameleon - thanks for your posting - i presumed 'despair' was referring to the modern equivalent of creosote as there doesnt seem to be a short/one-word version of wood-preservative-treatment!
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Postby Maverick.uk » Fri Jul 15, 2005 2:36 pm

kingston wrote: i presumed 'despair' was referring !


Definitely cos of this

Despair wrote:"New" creosote comes in light or dark brown


Mav
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Postby despair » Fri Jul 15, 2005 2:59 pm

My Farm Shop sells the NEW creosote which conforms to the EU directives

The old style creosote has indeed been withdrawn from public sale

and yes paint the ivy roots etc with "new " creosote " or glyphosate and the problem will slowly resolve
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Postby kingston » Fri Jul 15, 2005 3:03 pm

great - thanks for the tip - i will give it a go!
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Postby chameleon » Fri Jul 15, 2005 4:58 pm

were you a teacher Maverick?
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Postby Maverick.uk » Fri Jul 15, 2005 11:20 pm

chameleon wrote:were you a teacher Maverick?


Nope, "was" implies i'm retired, and unfortunatley im far from it. For your information I am an Engineer by trade, thats time served apprentice not a local garage mechanic. Unfortuanatley we do tend to see detail and can be very black and white.

Cheers

Mav
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Postby nigelrb » Sat Jul 16, 2005 9:03 am

Not as black and white as me, though, Mav!!!
Life is never what it seems; there is always two sides to every story.
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