Willow Tree

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Willow Tree

Postby mark1 » Mon Jul 18, 2005 7:34 am

I would like to plant a willow tree. I assume that they are evergreen. How long to they get to a decent height? Any advice on planting etc. would be gratefuly received.
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Postby despair » Mon Jul 18, 2005 8:51 am

Unless you are planting a willow by the side of a stream or river or to dry out a boggy area and well away from any property or drains then you would be best advised to choose a very different tree indeed

Willows need lots of water and just love to get their roots in drains
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Evergreen Willow?

Postby Arbcat » Mon Jul 18, 2005 9:01 am

I am sure that there are no evergreen willows. If you want an evergreen you will need to consider other species.

With good moisture levels willows will grow extremely quickly. They are fully capable of shoot extension of around 3-4 feet per year.

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Willow Tree

Postby mark1 » Mon Jul 18, 2005 10:39 am

Thanx for replies. The ground is well drained. The position is well away from any structures. Want an instant tree which looks pretty, that why I thought the willows look nice and can get a decent height but probably not wet enough for it.
Any suggestions please.
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Postby red wookie » Mon Jul 18, 2005 12:44 pm

How about Silver birches,or a small group/stand??-grow pretty quick,are great for wild life-look good in winter too
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Postby vorlich » Mon Jul 18, 2005 7:10 pm

i had a kilmarnock willow... its deciduois, very very lush. did very well even though it wasn't in a boggy spot, it got only to about 5 foot, so is good for the smaller garden.

however... for some reason, every summer it seemed to be a host for breeding flies... it was gruesome... there were hundreds, yuk! even the thougt made me sick!

have since moved, and the person who bougt the house probably cut it down.

i wouild go as suggested with maybe a weeping birch... now there is a stunnning looking tree!!
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Re: Willow Tree

Postby Arbcat » Tue Jul 19, 2005 9:09 am

hazelnut wrote:Any suggestions please.


Sweet or Spanish Chestnut (Castanea sativa) would possibly be a good option. It is also very quick growing but is deciduous. The benefits are that you can coppice it regularly and you get edible nuts. Its not native, but has been here since at least Roman times.

Other options would be London Plane (Platanus x hipanica) or Oriental Plane (Platanus orientalis) again they are not evergreen but are quick growers.

Both the Plane trees can get to around 25-35 metres and the Chestnut can get to around 30m.

For any more suggestions it would help if you can give some idea of the scale of tree and the desired affect. ie, majestic landscape feature, lone spire that draws the eye, screening, multiple planting, etc. Also some idea of the distances and size of the area to be planted.

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Postby Beech » Tue Jul 19, 2005 2:06 pm

hazelnut wrote:I would like to plant a willow tree. I assume that they are evergreen.


Willows are deciduous but from our experience are the first to come into leaf in the spring and the last to lose their leaves in the winter. A mature specimen is huge.

There are loads of evergreen trees to choose from (they tend to loase their leaves in the spring/summer) and it'd be personal choice, and you'd have to make sure you have the space for amature specimen. I think if I could grow only one evergreen tree it would be a choice between a Yew (Taxus) http://www.the-tree.org.uk/BritishTrees/yew.htm which grows reasonably quickly, tolerates hard pruning and is long lived, and a Holm Oak (Quercus ilex) http://www.first-nature.com/trees/quercus_ilex.htm which has dark shiny leaves and little acorns or to brighten up a garden there are variegated Hollys (Ilex species) which also have berries.

Why not go to an arboretum, botanic garden or somewhere similar where you can see mature trees that have labels attached to them so you can choose, rather than just looking at them in pots in your local garden centre.

Willows are fast growing and their roots seek water, few are good to have in small gardens, but there is one that is multi-stemmed, has twisted leaves and branches that looks quite nice. I think it's called Salix tortuosa.

If you choose a fast growing tree to fill a space you need to remember that it will carry on growing fast and perhaps need a lot of maintenance.
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Postby nigelrb » Tue Jul 19, 2005 6:13 pm

Hi there;

Paulownia tree - the tree of trees!

http://www.the-tree.org.uk/BritishTrees/TreeGallery/foxglovetreec.htm

cheers, Nigel
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Postby despair » Tue Jul 19, 2005 9:15 pm

seedlings of same doing well in my greenhouse right now
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