What replaces a conifer and is just as hardy?

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What replaces a conifer and is just as hardy?

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Tue Mar 23, 2010 6:08 pm

We want to replace a conifer with something else that will grow up but not out too much. We don’t want anything that will grow too tall, something that can be pruned to shape. This plant/tree will replace a conifer that we are fed up with, but we want something that doesn’t mind a bit of shade and is evergreen.

It will fit into a corner of a front garden where it can't overhang. A conifer is ideal but we really want something different and can't seem to find what we want at local garden centres.

Any thoughts? :)
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Postby Conveyancer » Tue Mar 23, 2010 7:26 pm

What replaces a conifer and is just as hardy?

A Laurel!
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Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Wed Mar 24, 2010 12:12 am

Conveyancer wrote:What replaces a conifer and is just as hardy?

A Laurel!


But Stan Laurel has already been planted!!! :wink:

Are Laurels poisonous to animals?
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Postby appledore » Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:42 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:
Conveyancer wrote:What replaces a conifer and is just as hardy?

A Laurel!


But Stan Laurel has already been planted!!! :wink:

Are Laurels poisonous to animals?


Yes, laurels are poisonous to animals.

I've given the problem a great deal of thought, but I haven't really come up with anything. :D

Escallonia is evergreen and grows quite fast, but it isn't very compact and sometimes needs tying to something. The same with red robin.
Why not plant another type of conifer? We have some that have cream markings on the ends of the branches, and they look really nice. :)
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Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:08 pm

appledore wrote:
WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:
Conveyancer wrote:What replaces a conifer and is just as hardy?

A Laurel!


Are Laurels poisonous to animals?


Yes, laurels are poisonous to animals.

I've given the problem a great deal of thought, but I haven't really come up with anything. :D

Escallonia is evergreen and grows quite fast, but it isn't very compact and sometimes needs tying to something. The same with red robin.
Why not plant another type of conifer? We have some that have cream markings on the ends of the branches, and they look really nice. :)


Hi apples. I don't think I will be planting Laurels, we don’t want to be killing off peoples pets. Another conifer might be the answer, I really don't like the idea of having to tie a tree to anything. We just want something that will grow a nice shape and be big enough to fill a corner of the garden.

As with all things that need doing in the garden this year it will be a case of prioritising jobs, there are so many at the moment, I should think we will put something major off for another year. Once the nice weather comes and we have done most jobs we will want to enjoy the garden as well as work on it. We still haven't sorted the paving out and it gets worse each year. :shock:

Do you spend most good weather gardening apples? Mine is usually spent painting things, most planting gets done over spring and then it is just a case of watering and trimming bits. :lol:
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Postby appledore » Wed Mar 24, 2010 7:37 pm

Hi Will. We usually have a list of things that need doing in the garden, but they don't all get done. We filled the pond in last year, and that took a long time. We were frightened our little granddaughter would fall in when she starts walking. I must admit I don't like ponds, and the garden looks much better without it. We should have filled it in years ago. :)

We don't usually have a lot of planting to do. We've mostly planted shrubs and plants that come every year, but a lot will need replacing this year because of the cold winter. We plant up some pots and hanging baskets in the spring, then it's just a case of keeping the garden tidy.

If we're in the garden we're pottering about, we don't like sitting in the sun. I enjoy cutting things back in the autumn. Give me some secateurs and I'm happy. :lol:

Is your paving uneven?
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Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Wed Mar 24, 2010 7:54 pm

appledore wrote:Is your paving uneven?


Our paving brings a whole new meaning to crazy paving, we should have a mad hatters tea party on it. :lol: We were going to replace it but we spent the money on other things, we could make it a little better with some work so might see what we can salvage this year and perhaps re-pave next year or the year after.

appledore wrote:If we're in the garden we're pottering about, we don't like sitting in the sun. I enjoy cutting things back in the autumn. Give me some secateurs and I'm happy. :lol:


But what about sitting on an upturned bucket eating value sausages under a brolly? Oh you must try it! Nothing better than sipping a cocktail sat on a bucket in the rain eating sausages with a plastic spork. :lol: :lol: :wink:

This year we might try a chair but we fear the indulgence might spark the need for a bed and then where will it end??? A Settee? We will perhaps try a plastic deck chair and see if we can cope. :lol:
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Postby appledore » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:15 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:But what about sitting on an upturned bucket eating value sausages under a brolly? Oh you must try it! Nothing better than sipping a cocktail sat on a bucket in the rain eating sausages with a plastic spork. :lol: :lol: :wink:

This year we might try a chair but we fear the indulgence might spark the need for a bed and then where will it end??? A Settee? We will perhaps try a plastic deck chair and see if we can cope. :lol:


An upturned bucket certainly adds ambience to the garden, but add a water feature and you'll need the bucket the right way up. :wink: :lol:
I wouldn't bother with a bed, you could lie low on a lilo. Once you master that you'll be able to cope with a plastic deck chair. :lol:
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Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:36 pm

appledore wrote:An upturned bucket certainly adds ambience to the garden, but add a water feature and you'll need the bucket the right way up. :wink: :lol:
I wouldn't bother with a bed, you could lie low on a lilo. Once you master that you'll be able to cope with a plastic deck chair. :lol:


We have a water feature, it is me drinking 10 cups of tea one after another. :lol: The Lilo sounds like a good idea, we could fill them with water and have an un-posh water bed. :wink:

As we were thinking about having a hot tub in the garden and have spent the budget for that too, instead we now could buy a paddling pool and eat lots of baked beans. Where there is a will, there is a way. :lol:

Anyway enough of my silliness, when you say you have a conifer with cream ends, are you sure that is natural or have you given it streaks? :lol: :oops:
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Postby appledore » Thu Mar 25, 2010 5:34 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:As we were thinking about having a hot tub in the garden and have spent the budget for that too, instead we now could buy a paddling pool and eat lots of baked beans. Where there is a will, there is a way. :lol:

Anyway enough of my silliness, when you say you have a conifer with cream ends, are you sure that is natural or have you given it streaks? :lol: :oops:


Baked beans are a good idea, a few hard boiled eggs wouldn't come amiss either. It would smell like a spa. :lol:

Our pond had a waterfall, it sounded like a horse relieving itself. :lol:

I get our hairdresser to give the conifer streaks. It looks lovely. :wink:
Keep calm and carry on.
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Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:42 pm

appledore wrote:Our pond had a waterfall, it sounded like a horse relieving itself. :lol:

I get our hairdresser to give the conifer streaks. It looks lovely. :wink:


You pond won't have been as diabolically crap as our neighbours is, oh goodness it is a plastic bath with a fake rock on top. :twisted: :lol: Still it is funny to look at because he only got it because he was eavesdropping on a conversation with my friend when I told her I wanted a pond. I knew he was listening, we made him buy many pointless bits of tat.

Your hairdresser must have very green fingers too, you should ask for some more punky colours and have rainbow conifers. :wink:
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Postby Uriah Heap » Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:21 pm

try lonicera baggessons gold

try googling it but most of the phots onilne are not very good

bright yellow leaves in summer. ebergreen leaves are a bit greener in winter

it looks really nice when you trim it to a round shape

supposed to grow to 45cms but i have two tht are 5 foot and 1 that is 8 foot high

likes good light
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Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:07 am

Thanks for that Uriah Heap, we have still been looking for something to replace this conifer. The trouble is the part of the garden where it would be planted only gets a bit of sun in late afternoon. I do like that you can shape it because we can't have something that grows wild with no shape as it is close to the boundary.
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Postby Uriah Heap » Fri Apr 23, 2010 7:33 pm

it will grow ok if there is part shade just that some of the leaves might be more green and less golden where it gets no light.

benefits fromtriming seems to make the leaves denser.

just the job for topiary i have seen a hedge of these plants carved into a garden seat shape so you can do a lot with them. if you leave them without trimming (once or twice a years) they still look ok but have a nice hairly look if you know what i mean. a bit like a berberis
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Postby kipper » Fri Apr 23, 2010 10:38 pm

Cotoneaster c. simonsii. Grows about 6-7ft tall. Small pink-streaked white flowers attract bees in early summer with red berries in autumn.
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