Tree growing on roof

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Tree growing on roof

Postby Primrose » Wed May 05, 2010 12:14 pm

Not sure if this is roots, trees or walls question so I've put it under general. :?

I have a tree growing on my roof next to the chimney pot! Not sure what it is although there are usually lots of ash tree seedling in the garden. It's probably about a foot high now, maybe a bit more and it's been there a year or two. Obviously it needs to be removed but I'm burying my head in the sand.

My neighbour apparently went up on the roof yesterday and tried to pull it but it won't move. It's a shared chimney (1930's semi) with 4 chimney pots on one chimney area but apparently it's our chimney pot that's affected (?) according to our neighbour.

My husband is planning on climbing up - I'd rather he didn't as it's very high and he has no experience of walking on slates or being on a high roof (he's in his 30s) The back slates slope down to the ground floor windows but the front roof slopes to the first floor windows so less roof there. The back is safer for a ladder to stand. There is a velux window in the attic at the back.

Assumming he can reach it, what should he do? Saw it off then use some sort of weed root killer? Or just use weed killer? (What kind?)

Any suggestions gratefully received. Many thanks
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Re: Tree growing on roof

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Wed May 05, 2010 12:26 pm

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3497/346 ... 14.jpg?v=0

You could make a great feature of it. :oops:

Just chop it off and pour some roundup on its roots. :lol:
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Postby appledore » Wed May 05, 2010 4:57 pm

It'll look good at Christmas with some lights. :D

As Will says, some Roundup would probably do the trick.
Keep calm and carry on.
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Postby arborlad » Wed May 05, 2010 5:22 pm

It's almost certainly a buddleia, one of the true pioneer species and famed for growing just about anywhere.

It sounds like you've caught it fairly soon, but it will still have done some damage that will need to be rectified.

Short term you need to spray it with Roundup to prevent further damage, but it will need some fully emerged leaves to absorb the poison.

Don't try to dislodge it by pulling, that will only be lime mortar on that chimney.

Don't attempt to go on the roof without a proper roof ladder, if the roof isn't damaged now, it will be after!!

Longer term you need to get a roofer/builder to repair any damage.

How much of this is DIY, and how much professional really depends on your abilities - but if you're at all unsure - leave it to the pro's!!
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Postby Primrose » Fri May 07, 2010 12:39 pm

Thanks all for your advice. We have a friend who does building work who may go up on the roof for us; not sure if he actually has a roof ladder though. It's getting up there that's the main problem but I suppose we do need a couple of other pieces of work done on the roof like a slate replacing and the other chimney at the opposite end being re-plastered so at least it wouldn't just be for the one thing. Have to raid the piggy bank for all that!

Yes, it might be nice as a feature with lights on but I think I'd prefer a safe and solid house!!

Thanks again.!
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Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Fri May 07, 2010 3:04 pm

Primrose wrote:Yes, it might be nice as a feature with lights on but I think I'd prefer a safe and solid house!!


Lights as well!! Oooh tempting I'm sure. :wink: Yes, a safe house is much better. :) I hope you get it all sorted and whoever goes up the ladder stays safe, I get dizzy just thinking about that. :lol:
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Postby appledore » Fri May 07, 2010 4:36 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:I hope you get it all sorted and whoever goes up the ladder stays safe, I get dizzy just thinking about that. :lol:


Me too! I don't like heights. Even high heeled shoes make me feel dizzy. :wink: :lol:
Keep calm and carry on.
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Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Fri May 07, 2010 8:14 pm

appledore wrote:Me too! I don't like heights. Even high heeled shoes make me feel dizzy. :wink: :lol:


Me too, I'm sooo dizzy I fall if I look up for too long. :oops:

If the nfh wore heels he would go from Narcissist to Hitler in 3" :lol: :lol:
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Postby Clifford Pope » Mon May 10, 2010 10:13 am

Roundup is absorbed through the leaves, not woody stems or roots.
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Postby Primrose » Mon May 10, 2010 2:24 pm

Yes, thanks, we got some root killer which you paint on.

Now we just need someone to go up. I don't like heights either. Husband is more courageous but no experience of walking on a slated roof. Hopefully his pal can help.
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Postby Clifford Pope » Tue May 11, 2010 9:17 am

You can spray a jet a long way if you adjust the nozzle and pump it up well. Do you actually need to go beyond the top of the ladder?
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Postby Treeman » Tue May 11, 2010 10:06 am

Clifford Pope wrote:Roundup is absorbed through the leaves, not woody stems or roots.


Roundup (Glyphosate) is a trans located systemic herbicide and can be applied foliar (leaves) or applied to vascular areas such as cut stems.

Glyphosate is also capable of being absorbed through bark and will penetrate roots.

For a small tree on a roof, cut the offending item off, mix the herbicide with a stiffening agent (wallpaper paste works well) to prevent it running away, cut the finger off a rubber glove stuff it with the mix and secure it over the cut end with an elastic band.
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Postby Primrose » Tue May 11, 2010 8:17 pm

Tree has now been removed for a small price by a friend who does that sort of thing (ie odd jobs!)and had no fear of heights. Stump (about 1cm across) was painted with some stump killer. (I like the idea of the rubber glove finger so will remember that next time - hope there isn't one!) Tree was about 18 inches tall and looked like a birch complete with catkins.

Until my next gardening problem. Many thanks :)
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Re: Tree growing on roof

Postby Stacey79 » Mon Jul 08, 2013 5:17 pm

I know this is a really old post, but I got here from Google - I recently noticed a small tree starting to grow on the chimney - not sure if I should get a roofer to remove it or is it going to die on it's own? It hasn't rained for 5 days now, but it still looks green and healthy - any plants in a pot on my patio would have died a long time ago left without water, but this thing seems to be happy sitting right in the sun and nothing but bricks to support it's roots.
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Re: Tree growing on roof

Postby Obliwion » Wed Sep 30, 2015 12:53 pm

Stacey79 wrote:I know this is a really old post, but I got here from Google - I recently noticed a small tree starting to grow on the chimney - not sure if I should get a roofer to remove it or is it going to die on it's own? It hasn't rained for 5 days now, but it still looks green and healthy - any plants in a pot on my patio would have died a long time ago left without water, but this thing seems to be happy sitting right in the sun and nothing but bricks to support it's roots.

There might be some hidden water up there, or some old rotten wood which is full of water. Some trees also happily go without water for ages. Don't count on it to go away on its own, cut it down and treat it with a herbicide.
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