shrubs

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shrubs

Postby rosalyn » Tue Nov 01, 2005 11:32 pm

Hi,

wonder if anyone can give me advice on which shrubs I could plant to create a screen, I want something to give height without spread as I live in a terraced house with small garden.

thanks,

rosalyn
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Postby despair » Thu Nov 03, 2005 9:55 pm

Pyracantha can be kept neat and slim
Bamboos if planted in a deep pot sunk into the ground will stay put
Philadelphus can be kept pruned back to stay slim at base

In fact most shrubs can be pruned after flowering to any shape you want

You can fan train lots of ordinary very reasonably priced shrubs

Winter Jasmine is also excellent for screening but staying slim tucked under wires along a fence
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Postby rosalyn » Fri Nov 04, 2005 10:46 pm

Thank for those suggestions Despair,

I like the idea of the bamboo planted in the container, I never thought of that.

regards, rosalyn
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Postby despair » Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:05 pm

If you plant Bamboo in a container it can be any old bucket etc but be sure that it has an adequately large hole in the base for drainage

Bamboos do like moisture but do not need to be soggy
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Postby Beech » Mon Nov 07, 2005 12:14 am

You could put some trellis and grow climbers across it. You can use evergreen climbers which will give an all year round screen, but after a few years deciduous ones will work just as well.

You could also put some heavy duty rope/cable on posts and grow climbers along it, roses look amazing as do some clematis!

Have you thought about growing fruit trees as espaliers? That's with horizontal branches evenly spaced out? You can get 'family' trees, with more than one variety per rootstock. You might get some ideas here The basics of apple cultivation
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Postby rosalyn » Mon Nov 14, 2005 2:48 pm

Thank you for those suggestions Beech, certainly interested in the espaliers and family apple trees .

My niece has just bought a house in North Yorkshire, the garden is full of interesting plants shrubs and trees. Whilst visiting I spotted a really lovely tall slim tree with light green fan shaped leaves, no one knew what it was called.

My niece has just emailed me to say her neighbour has told her the tree is a very old tree called ginko biloba,and it is just dropping its leaves.

I am going to google to see what information I can find but would be pleased to recieve advice from anyone who knows anything about this tree.

With thanks,
Rosalyn
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Postby Beech » Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:31 pm

Ginkho is a lovely tree, with quite delicate leaves. They are an ancient species.

There are a few pictures Gingko Tree

Friends have one in their front garden, it's being trained to grow with a twisted trunk. It's really pretty in leaf, but of course is deciduous.
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