Neighbours Tree Leaning

Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby Candy » Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:34 am

Our neighbour has several alder trees at the bottom of their garden. One of the trunks leans into our garden blocking the view and giving off a lot of shade. Also the branches are now half way across the garden. I can post pics if required.

The trunk comes over our side at about 5ft and then continues to lean onto our side. The tree surgeon has asked that we get permission to access from their side but so far they have not come back to us. I know we are able to remove the branches that overhang but what about a trunk that leans if they dont give us permission. It is a very large tree which is not maintained at all. It may be we will have to just cut back the branches to the trunk which may look odd but would have no option.

Many thanks
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Re: Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby despair » Tue Aug 14, 2012 12:48 pm

You could cut the trunk right through vertically at the Boundary since you have a legal right to abate the nuiscance of the tree

You have no right to a view but equally you do not have to tolerate the overhang /leaning of a neighbours tree
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Re: Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby Candy » Tue Aug 14, 2012 5:25 pm

Thanks for that - I assume we would need permission if we wanted to gain access from their side of the garden?
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Re: Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby Rowan » Tue Aug 14, 2012 6:47 pm

If you have the alder cut where it crosses your boundary, be aware that it will sprout lots of shoots very quickly

Alder is a tree that has traditionally been coppiced to provide wood for charcoal, hurdle-making, thatching spars, bank repair weaving (it survives a long time under water), firewood, baskets, and many more wood crafts

I suspect your tree surgeon might prefer to take the tree back to its base if possible - it will still sprout but not over your boundary - will also look nicer

If you go down the route of cutting off branches and leaving the trunk, then again it will sprout masses of shoots at each branch site - will become a constant job in the future
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Re: Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby despair » Tue Aug 14, 2012 7:58 pm

Precisely

Alder is a rubbish tree and is unsuitable for a domestic garden
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Re: Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby arborlad » Tue Aug 14, 2012 8:52 pm

Rowan wrote:Alder is a tree that has traditionally been coppiced to provide wood for charcoal,


Highly prized for its use in gunpowder.
arborlad

smile...it confuses people
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Re: Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby Candy » Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:16 pm

Oh dear doesnt sound too good then apart from cutting right down. Thanks for your advice
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Re: Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby TO » Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:33 pm

Hi

despair wrote:You could cut the trunk right through vertically at the Boundary since you have a legal right to abate the nuiscance of the tree
Subject to statutory protection you can, as has been said, cut it back to the boundary. However, the tree, at least from what we have been told, is not a nuisance in law so there is nothing to abate.

You don't have a right to light either

despair wrote:Alder is a rubbish tree and is unsuitable for a domestic garden
Alders are nice trees. They grow quickly to a medium height suitable for many domestic gardens. They have a compact pyramidal shaped crown, they can tolerate compacted soil, poor quality low nutrient soil, and waterlogged soil, they have root nodules like peas and beans that fix atmospheric nitrogen into the soil improving it, and are bee friendly. There are many different species and varieties, they have interesting yellow catkins and a purple hue on the twigs in spring, some have yellow leaves providing all summer long colour, some have cut leaves giving a light airy feel. As previously posted they have many uses, and to add to the list, water troughs, boats, and clogs, and its considered bad luck to cut one down, at least in Scotland, so I'm told. All in all they are a lot of things, but rubbish isn't one of them.

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Re: Neighbours Tree Leaning

Postby Candy » Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:02 pm

Alders are nice trees. They grow quickly to a medium height suitable for many domestic gardens. They have a compact pyramidal shaped crown, they can tolerate compacted soil, poor quality low nutrient soil, and waterlogged soil, they have root nodules like peas and beans that fix atmospheric nitrogen into the soil improving it, and are bee friendly. There are many different species and varieties, they have interesting yellow catkins and a purple hue on the twigs in spring, some have yellow leaves providing all summer long colour, some have cut leaves giving a light airy feel. As previously posted they have many uses, and to add to the list, water troughs, boats, and clogs, and its considered bad luck to cut one down, at least in Scotland, so I'm told. All in all they are a lot of things, but rubbish isn't one of them.


You wouldnt say they are nice trees if you had to live with these - there are four or five trunks and are at least 30 feet high in not a large garden. They make a mess with all the bits that come off and generally having so many in such a small area is not nice. We have even considered moving house as our neighbours also have a walnut tree, apple tree and a strange large looking tree which are all along the boundary. Thankfully the eucalyptus has been removed. I wouldnt mind so much if they all were regularly maintained and not left to go wild.
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