Tree ~40cm from wall

Tree ~40cm from wall

Postby ejay » Sat Sep 08, 2012 6:25 pm

Hi,
I'd really like to hear any thoughts on the folllowing situation:
Tree ~ 40cm from party wall (of garage), roughly 6-7m tall, fairly sure it is an ash tree. Wall next to tree does not look cracked at present.
How likely is there to be a problem as the tree gets bigger?
More detail:
I put in an offer on a property and the mortgage valuer said there was 'movement to the garage', i.e. a couple of cracks in the garage floor, suggested the tree outside the garage wall was responsible and that a structural engineer would have to make a report. The vendor paid for the engineer, he says the soil in the area is not clay based, and he thinks the 'movement' could be due to a leaking drain in the garage affecting the fill so the vendor would need to get the drains checked and if so fixed. He also said to me that he thought the tree was a laburnum, and when I asked if he thought there would be a problem due to physical damage, said it was a couple of metres from the wall and it should be fine. I was very surprised he thought it was that far, and not sure about the tree id. The tree is on the neighbours land as the garage wall is a party wall, so I went round to visit the neighbour, had a better look at the tree and measured the distance from it to the wall : 40cm. Spent some time comparing leaves etc online and am sure it is not a laburnum and looks like an ash, with the key type seeds.The ground in the neighbours garden where the tree is growing is ~1.5m below the 'ground' level of the garage and main building.
I have read that ash trees grow to ~30m in height, and am wondering whether I should just leave the property well alone unless the neighbour is willing to cut down the tree. Is it really likely that a tree could grow that big that close without affecting the foundations..?
ejay
 
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Re: Tree ~40cm from wall

Postby arsie » Sun Sep 09, 2012 11:29 am

I have a weird sense of deja vu reading this :shock:

Several years, ago we demolished an old outhouse and 'rebuilt' it (conservation area) as a double garage. Because of the neighbour's aging mature ash tree perhaps 15 metres or more high, only inches from the fence marking our boundary but over 10 metres away from the garage, we had to make an expensive floating foundation pad to satisfy the local authority i.e. not the usual strip foundations. This tree was obviously dying as it didn't bud until June and was first to drop its leaves in September and it has now been chopped down by the new neighbours.

Make what you will of our experience but we do live in a clay subsoil part of the world here.
arsie
 
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Re: Tree ~40cm from wall

Postby Treeman » Sun Sep 09, 2012 8:15 pm

arsie wrote:I have a weird sense of deja vu reading this :shock:

Several years, ago we demolished an old outhouse and 'rebuilt' it (conservation area) as a double garage. Because of the neighbour's aging mature ash tree perhaps 15 metres or more high, only inches from the fence marking our boundary but over 10 metres away from the garage, we had to make an expensive floating foundation pad to satisfy the local authority i.e. not the usual strip foundations. This tree was obviously dying as it didn't bud until June and was first to drop its leaves in September and it has now been chopped down by the new neighbours.

Make what you will of our experience but we do live in a clay subsoil part of the world here.



How obvious was it? Ash is always the last out of bed and the first back in it.
Treeman
 
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Re: Tree ~40cm from wall

Postby arsie » Sun Sep 09, 2012 9:06 pm

Treeman wrote:
arsie wrote:I have a weird sense of deja vu reading this :shock:

Several years, ago we demolished an old outhouse and 'rebuilt' it (conservation area) as a double garage. Because of the neighbour's aging mature ash tree perhaps 15 metres or more high, only inches from the fence marking our boundary but over 10 metres away from the garage, we had to make an expensive floating foundation pad to satisfy the local authority i.e. not the usual strip foundations. This tree was obviously dying as it didn't bud until June and was first to drop its leaves in September and it has now been chopped down by the new neighbours.

Make what you will of our experience but we do live in a clay subsoil part of the world here.



How obvious was it? Ash is always the last out of bed and the first back in it.


I have lived here now over 12 years and Carol much longer. The tree's season was getting shorter - in my time, by a month or so - and it was increasingly dropping dead twigs and, in windy times, branches on us. Sadly the trunk had long ago split quite close to the ground. Our old neighbour had banded the split trunk but it was an on-going problem. It was a lovely tree and gave us a nice dappled shade which we still miss.
arsie
 
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Location: Norfolk


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