Willow tree, roots damage etc

Willow tree, roots damage etc

Postby louisehj » Tue Mar 12, 2013 7:42 pm

Hi everyone

I am wanting advice on where we stand with regard to our neighbours willow tree. Basically the tree is very close to our house, approx 15-20 feet from my front door. We believe she planted this tree approx 35 years ago.

The tree is growing excessively over my boundary and given that it is a willow which has grown to a height of over 40ft we cannot just reach up or get a ladder to cut it back. There are small branches regularly falling from the tree which sometimes fall onto my car, there is also the added problem that in autumn the amount of leaves that it looses caused all my gutters to block.

Then there is the problem with the roots, my driveway has been lifting and cracks appearing which I have no doubt is due to the roots, the council regularly come out to resurface the pavement where the roots have lifted the pavement. My driveway is now very uneven now due to this and we are reluctant to have any remedial work done whilst the tree is still there as we will have to foot the bill only for the problem to reocccur. There is also a drain which runs between out property and tree, and approx 9 years ago we had to have the drains relined as the roots had penetrated the drains and there were rootballs which were blocking the drains.

We have spoken to our neighbour on a number of occasions about this, even at one point offering to remove the tree for her to which the reply is alway "I like the tree"

Any advice on where we stand legally and how can we take this further
louisehj
 
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Re: Willow tree, roots damage etc

Postby TO » Tue Mar 12, 2013 9:04 pm

Hi

Your problems are not unusual. In fact they're all quite common and to some extent easily remedied unless you want rid of the tree, which belongs to your neighbour and over which you have no control.

louisehj wrote:The tree is growing excessively over my boundary and given that it is a willow which has grown to a height of over 40ft we cannot just reach up or get a ladder to cut it back.
Well you can cut back the tree to the boundary. Check for statutory protection, tree preservation order, or conservation area status first. Get a tree surgeon, who will have little difficulty doing the work. Don't forget to offer the arisings back to the tree owner, and if they decline the offer dispose of the arisings in a responsible manner.

louisehj wrote:There are small branches regularly falling from the tree which sometimes fall onto my car, there is also the added problem that in autumn the amount of leaves that it looses caused all my gutters to block
Trees shed stuff. Having cut it back to the boundary this will help resolve the problem of stuff falling on your car. Another solution is don't park beneath the tree. Gutter guards are available which reduce the problem of leaves in gutters.

louisehj wrote:my driveway has been lifting and cracks appearing which I have no doubt is due to the roots,
Prove it.
louisehj wrote:we are reluctant to have any remedial work done whilst the tree is still there as we will have to foot the bill only for the problem to reocccur.
Well if you can prove the roots are the problem the answer is repair the drive. Cut the roots of at the boundary to reduce the risk of further damage. Write to your neighbour putting them on notice that they will be responsible for any future costs in repairing the drive if the damage is caused by the roots.

louisehj wrote: we had to have the drains relined as the roots had penetrated the drains and there were rootballs which were blocking the drains.
Almost certainly the drains were faulty in the first instance prior to root ingress. Relining should have solved the problem, and unless the drains continue to leak, the roots will not be a problem.

louisehj wrote:We have spoken to our neighbour on a number of occasions about this, even at one point offering to remove the tree for her to which the reply is alway "I like the tree"
It's their tree, so they can do with it as they see fit.

TO
TO
 
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