crown lifting .......... your definition please

Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby despair » Sat Oct 12, 2013 9:29 pm

Tree surgeon says

No point cutting back to boundary because this kind of sycamore simply grows doubly bushy and thick on the cut side and will make tree look awful and not solve the problem
Owner will not consent to crown lift and in order to give neighbour light would need to be very high up and threaten the tree

So the neighbour is left stuck with a 100ft wide shadow across their garden day in day out

Tree huggers win!!!!
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby Treeman » Mon Oct 14, 2013 8:01 am

despair wrote:Tree surgeon says

No point cutting back to boundary because this kind of sycamore simply grows doubly bushy and thick on the cut side and will make tree look awful and not solve the problem
Owner will not consent to crown lift and in order to give neighbour light would need to be very high up and threaten the tree

So the neighbour is left stuck with a 100ft wide shadow across their garden day in day out

Tree huggers win!!!!



That should read despair says tree surgeon says

Of course it will grow back and yes it wont look good but it will solve the problem for quite some time

How can the owner not consent to a crown lift? Do it yourself you don't need consent from the owner to cut back to the boundary and it wont threaten the tree in any way.

Stop being defeatist and wallowing in "woe is me"

Tree cutters win
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby despair » Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:12 am

A very highly qualified and respected tree surgeon was consulted and his opinion was as stated

1) the tree would look absolutely awful and totally lopsided
2) it would grow back far thicker on the neighbours side very quickly and block even more light
3) the main branches blocking light that need crown lifting are well within owners garden and cannot be touched
4)the main problem of shadowing such a large area of the neighbours garden can only be solved by massive pruning on owners side which the owner will not allow
5) the tree has one main trunk that is upright but a 2ndary trunk that is at a 30 degree angle out across the owners garden and the whole tree is set at an angle to the neighbours garden which is why such a wide area is affected
6) it is the 2ndary trunk growing out at such an angle and lack of care years ago that has led to the problem
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby Treeman » Tue Oct 15, 2013 9:29 pm

despair wrote:A very highly qualified and respected tree surgeon was consulted and his opinion was as stated

1) the tree would look absolutely awful and totally lopsided

So what?
2) it would grow back far thicker on the neighbours side very quickly and block even more light

Initially there will be a period of uncontrolled growth but apical dominance will re establish itself and the remainder of the growth will be subordinated by the new leader, this will take a couple of years and many more before its back to the point it is now so we are talking several YEARS. Is that what you call quick????, Oh and you can cut it again in the meantime.
3) the main branches blocking light that need crown lifting are well within owners garden and cannot be touched

Yes they can, if your man cant do it get someone who can
4)the main problem of shadowing such a large area of the neighbours garden can only be solved by massive pruning on owners side which the owner will not allow

That's got nothing to do with your original posting though has it.
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby despair » Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:12 pm

The owner will not allow the crown lifting thats really needed to resolve the wider problem

If just the bit that actually overhangs the neighbours garden is cut back it will only provide very partial relief
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby despair » Wed Oct 16, 2013 10:29 am

Its not up to me its up to the affected neighbour to decide

but cutting back what overhangs the boundary will not resolve the problem
a proper crown lift would though
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby arborlad » Wed Oct 16, 2013 1:31 pm

The removal of one whole trunk and 'massive pruning' can not, by any stretch of the imagination, be defined as crown lifting.
arborlad

smile...it confuses people
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby arsie » Wed Oct 16, 2013 7:14 pm

I agree arborlad sounds more like major surgery to me :|
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby despair » Wed Oct 16, 2013 7:22 pm

I have never suggested a trunk needs removing

What does need removing in crown lifting is about 4 branches that grow out from about 2 metres up
That would mean some light filters through to the neighbour

Well aware that removing the 2ndary trunk now would damage the tree

The whole problem is a forest tree thats been planted too close to a boundary and received no attention in its entire life
It constantly drops dead branches on the neighbours garden which they are told is result of being the shady side
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby arborlad » Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:08 pm

5) the tree has one main trunk that is upright but a 2ndary trunk that is at a 30 degree angle out across the owners garden and the whole tree is set at an angle to the neighbours garden which is why such a wide area is affected
6) it is the 2ndary trunk growing out at such an angle and lack of care years ago that has led to the problem
arborlad

smile...it confuses people
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Re: crown lifting .......... your definition please

Postby despair » Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:43 pm

Arborlad

Effectively there 2 trees in one hence why the canopy is so wide and the extent of shading on the neighbours garden equally wide

The neighbour has now had enough of trying to be the kind considerate helpful neighbour and is so fed up with the effect on their garden and the total lack of co-operation from the owner they are thinking of selling up

Cant see any new neighbour being so helpful so tree owner may rue the day they refused to see the problems their unmaintained tree has caused
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