Tree on boundary

Re: Tree on boundary

Postby tarren » Wed Apr 23, 2014 11:42 am

Every sycamore tree, in my garden at least, plays host to a member of the thrip family-the mess they make with their sticky excretions causes mold to grow on every plant in the near vicinity. My paths were covered with the mess, consequently I've chopped down the majority.
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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby TO » Wed Apr 23, 2014 12:30 pm

Hi

tarren wrote:Every sycamore tree, in my garden at least, plays host to a member of the thrip family-the mess they make with their sticky excretions causes mold to grow on every plant in the near vicinity. My paths were covered with the mess, consequently I've chopped down the majority.
More likely to be aphids than thrips. An important food source for garden wildlife especially birds.

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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby tarren » Wed Apr 23, 2014 6:10 pm

Hello TO,
By aphids, I take it you mean, the greenfly aphid? These are far larger than those, and make a correspondingly larger honeydew deposit.
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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby despair » Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:00 pm

Sycamores are the bane of many a neighbours life
not only te leaves but also the seedlings
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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby arsie » Thu Apr 24, 2014 4:38 pm

Sycamores grow large, live long, and are extremely prolific self seeders. The seeds travel quite a long way and are very hardy, surviving for years. Rarely are these trees suitable for the modern (small) garden environment and it costs money to maintain them to a suitable (modest) size. They look fine on big estates, managed, or isolated grown trees in field boundaries as shelter for cattle.

Every time I come across self-seeded saplings I chop 'em out of our hedges like other weeds such as bramble and elder.

Second only to Leylandii as pests imho.
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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby Mojisola » Thu Apr 24, 2014 5:19 pm

arsie wrote:Sycamores grow large, live long, and are extremely prolific self seeders. The seeds travel quite a long way and are very hardy, surviving for years. Rarely are these trees suitable for the modern (small) garden environment and it costs money to maintain them to a suitable (modest) size. They look fine on big estates, managed, or isolated grown trees in field boundaries as shelter for cattle.


Agree with this ^

Sycamores aren't good garden trees.
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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby Treeman » Thu Apr 24, 2014 5:43 pm

Mojisola wrote:
arsie wrote:Sycamores grow large, live long, and are extremely prolific self seeders. The seeds travel quite a long way and are very hardy, surviving for years. Rarely are these trees suitable for the modern (small) garden environment and it costs money to maintain them to a suitable (modest) size. They look fine on big estates, managed, or isolated grown trees in field boundaries as shelter for cattle.


Agree with this ^

Sycamores aren't good garden trees.



They aren't good woodland trees either, they are vigorous competitors and shade out native species (sycamore is naturalised, thought to have been introduced by the Romans)

They support a huuuuge amount of biomass in the form of aphids but compared to native species are low on diversity.

What they are good at, by and large is firewood, carcasing timber and the odd one has a figured grain that makes them hugely valuable for veneer.
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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby Janieb » Thu Apr 24, 2014 8:30 pm

Sycamores are a beautiful tree in the right place. As a variety of maple their leaves are lovely in the autumn. In my garden they are a weed. The bank at the end of my garden technically belongs to me but has been adopted as part of the highway and been landscaped by the County Council. They planted a linden tree so close to my wall that it cracked it, a beech tree which is no problem and a bl00dy sycamore that overhangs my garden and self seeds all over the place, together with the self propagating stag's horn from next door I spend twice a year digging up unwanted saplings. :evil:

Do not remind me that I have no right to a view, I already know, but I've also lost my view over the Thames Valley.
"I prefer rogues to imbeciles, because they sometimes take a rest" Alexandre Dumas (fils)
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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby TO » Fri Apr 25, 2014 5:25 pm

Hi

Treeman wrote:They aren't good woodland trees
They're good timber trees in the right conditions, like any other tree.
Treeman wrote:sycamore is naturalised
Debatable. There's a significant body of evidence and those who support the view that sycamores are native.
Treeman wrote:compared to native species are low on diversity
That depends how you measure diversity and such a blinkered statement misses the point entirely. Diversity is not just about the number of insect species associated with the tree. Every other species fares worse than oak in that respect. However, sycamore do better than a lot of other trees in terms of insects. They do exceptionally well if you look at the lichen species that are associated with them and compare it with other trees. Fungal associations, bryophyte associations, bacteria associations, algae associations, slime fluxes, mosses, and what associates with all those things etc etc etc is diversity.

arsie wrote:weeds such as bramble and elder
Define weeds. Brambles and elder are important food species and also important for species diversity.

despair wrote:not only te leaves
The leaves decay quickly and are great for worms, which are great for your garden, and great for feeding blackbirds, thrushes etc Unlike oak leaves which are full of tannins, and dont decay as quickly.

tarren wrote:By aphids, I take it you mean, the greenfly aphid? These are far larger than those, and make a correspondingly larger honeydew deposit
There are hundreds if not thousands of species of aphids in the UK. Who knows what you have. Honeydew is a food source for other insects and fungi, which of course go on to feed other things. Also as Treeman points out there is a massive biomass of aphids in sycamores. This feeds an awful lot of other creatures. This biomass in sycamores is building up just as the biomass in trees like oaks is falling off and is therefore an important source of tasty little insects.

arsie wrote:The seeds ........are very hardy, surviving for years
No they don't. They're shed with a high moisture content which makes them prone to fungal infection, and they die quickly if they dry out, hence they're hard to store.

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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby arsie » Fri Apr 25, 2014 7:13 pm

TO wrote:
arsie wrote:weeds such as bramble and elder
Define weeds. Brambles and elder are important food species and also important for species diversity.

Weeds in my eyes in my garden are any self or bird seeded species I don't want to take over my deciduous hedges.

TO wrote:
arsie wrote:The seeds ........are very hardy, surviving for years
No they don't. They're shed with a high moisture content which makes them prone to fungal infection, and they die quickly if they dry out, hence they're hard to store.

Ok but my neighbour took out a mature sycamore on our boundary three years ago and its seeds are still coming this spring.
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Re: Tree on boundary

Postby Treeman » Fri Apr 25, 2014 7:44 pm

TO wrote:Hi

Treeman wrote:They aren't good woodland trees
They're good timber trees in the right conditions, like any other tree.
Treeman wrote:sycamore is naturalised
Debatable. There's a significant body of evidence and those who support the view that sycamores are native.
Treeman wrote:compared to native species are low on diversity
That depends how you measure diversity and such a blinkered statement misses the point entirely. Diversity is not just about the number of insect species associated with the tree. Every other species fares worse than oak in that respect. However, sycamore do better than a lot of other trees in terms of insects. They do exceptionally well if you look at the lichen species that are associated with them and compare it with other trees. Fungal associations, bryophyte associations, bacteria associations, algae associations, slime fluxes, mosses, and what associates with all those things etc etc etc is diversity.

arsie wrote:weeds such as bramble and elder
Define weeds. Brambles and elder are important food species and also important for species diversity.

despair wrote:not only te leaves
The leaves decay quickly and are great for worms, which are great for your garden, and great for feeding blackbirds, thrushes etc Unlike oak leaves which are full of tannins, and dont decay as quickly.

tarren wrote:By aphids, I take it you mean, the greenfly aphid? These are far larger than those, and make a correspondingly larger honeydew deposit
There are hundreds if not thousands of species of aphids in the UK. Who knows what you have. Honeydew is a food source for other insects and fungi, which of course go on to feed other things. Also as Treeman points out there is a massive biomass of aphids in sycamores. This feeds an awful lot of other creatures. This biomass in sycamores is building up just as the biomass in trees like oaks is falling off and is therefore an important source of tasty little insects.

arsie wrote:The seeds ........are very hardy, surviving for years
No they don't. They're shed with a high moisture content which makes them prone to fungal infection, and they die quickly if they dry out, hence they're hard to store.

TO


Well step up the defender of the hated

I will still be breaking out the big saw
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