Border Trees

Border Trees

Postby Rachael » Thu Sep 11, 2014 2:32 pm

Hi Everyone, hope you're all well and that somebody may be able to give me some advice.

Our neighbour informed us a couple of months ago that he is planning to build a house at the bottom of his garden. He told us that the house will be built to look over the bottom of our garden and into the countryside and evening sunshine beyond. No complaint - it's his prerogative to do what he wants on his land.

His garden had a row of about 20 very mature evergreen and deciduous trees that formed the border with our garden. He mentioned he was planning to take "a couple" down prior to submitting planning permission, to help get permission and give light to the plot. He took down 7 mature trees. I told him I was upset as there is now scarcely any boundary between our gardens apart from a wire running along the remaining trees.

A week later and four more trees went, including a fantastic old Lime tree. Our border is now non-existent - we can look straight into his garden and their proposed building plot looks over ours.

We are just outside a conservation area, no TPOs were on the trees, the Tree Officer came out too late as they said the neighbour had already destroyed all the trees with any amenity value although they were concerned about remnants of a possible bat roost in the destroyed Lime.

The trees were beautiful and it's going to be impossible to replace them and the privacy they created.

I intend to buy a line a line of 2m high Leylandii to form the border (on my side) and then plant a line of mature (4m+) deciduous and evergreen trees on my side of the Leylandii. I don't want to look at the development so I'll need trees that doggedly cling to their leaves throughout winter.

Please can anybody help me with any of the questions below to help me plan the re-establishment of my garden...

1) Can anybody make any recommendations on beautiful, fast growing, deciduous trees that can bring colour and privacy back to the garden?
2) If I include conifers in the mature tree line, will the neighbours be able to have them cut back under High Hedge regulations?
3) Am I better off just planting the tallest wall of Leylandii I can find to try and put them off developing? Planning hasn't been submitted yet, proposed plot is about 30m from his house.
4) He's dumped all the chippings in a huge, steaming pile next to my kids swings. Is this dangerous/hazardous?

Many thanks in advance,

Rachael
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Re: Border Trees

Postby ukmicky » Thu Sep 11, 2014 9:54 pm

if there is going to be a house there i would not plant a line of evergreens or you will at sometime most likely get a high hedge complaint made against you. .

I would investigate other forms of trees or plants that do not come under the high hedge ledgislation.
Advice given is not legally qualified and you are advised to gain a professional opinion
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Re: Border Trees

Postby APC » Fri Sep 12, 2014 5:35 pm

Beech/hornbeam would be nice. Leaves brown off in autumn but are retained so act as a screen. The hornbeam especially has a high wildlife value.
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Re: Border Trees

Postby Roblewis » Fri Sep 12, 2014 7:26 pm

Do not forget the good old bamboo especially the Phyllastachys, niger and aurea, both make good 5-6 m high screens very quickly and are not subject to any high hedge issues and are evergreen. You can even go to some of the 20m giants around some nurseries if you wish.
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Re: Border Trees

Postby MacadamB53 » Fri Sep 12, 2014 8:29 pm

Hi Rachael,

Our neighbour informed us a couple of months ago that he is planning to build a house at the bottom of his garden... ...No complaint - it's his prerogative to do what he wants on his land...

...Am I better off just planting the tallest wall of Leylandii I can find to try and put them off developing? Planning hasn't been submitted yet, proposed plot is about 30m from his house.


why not leave it until he's built - but tell him of your intentions...

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: Border Trees

Postby despair » Sat Sep 13, 2014 3:35 pm

Removing the trees from a planning point of view was the most stupid thing he did because they just love screening

If you want to plant a screen I suggest

Photinia Red Robin
Clump forming Bamboo
Sky rocket conifers
Portuguese Laurel
Beech

Just be sure that the evegreens can never form a hedge that invokes the High Hedge Law

beyond that plant in well dug and really well composted soil and water well
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Re: Border Trees

Postby Treeman » Sat Sep 13, 2014 7:37 pm

despair wrote:Removing the trees from a planning point of view was the most stupid thing he did because they just love screening




You cant be serious

The screen or lack of wont have any affect on a planning application but a load of trees will
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Re: Border Trees

Postby Rachael » Sat Sep 13, 2014 8:49 pm

Many thanks for the replies everybody. It's much appreciated.

Mac - unfortunately I don't have a border with the neighbour anymore, I've got kids and a dog so waiting sadly isn't an option. It's pretty upsetting to look at the damage he's done so I'd rather screen it off sooner rather than later.

Rob - went to look at bamboos today thanks. They look great but a bit worried they might look a bit out of place in our garden. It's quite an old-fashioned English garden and the bamboos looked quite exotic/Asian but I'm tempted because it's such a quick and cost-effective solution.

APC - many thanks, both Beech and Hornbeam on order!

Despair - again thanks. If I have a conifer that doesn't touch another tree and stands alone, does that make it exempt from High Hedge legislation?

I've got an 8m tall Maple tree that's hidden in the other corner of our garden and its growth is now getting checked by the trees surrounding it. I'm thinking of moving the Maple into the new border. Is it possible to move a tree this large or would it struggle to survive a move? And does anybody have any idea how much this would cost?

Apologies for all the questions, It's just great to get such friendly, constructive feedback.

Rachael
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Re: Border Trees

Postby Roblewis » Sat Sep 13, 2014 9:51 pm

Be the first exotic gardener of the area :D :D :D . Depending on your soil rhododendrons, azaleas and camellias are to be found in east Asia along with bamboos. Ferns and Ficus also fit in well, hardy varieties abound. All like plenty of moisture at the roots Why not try a yellow magnolia for some contrast in the future. Even conifers will take up to 8 years to really get going.

Try something such as Hazel - one each of Cosford and Halls Giant will give good crops in a year or two. You get the benefit of the yellow catkins in early spring.
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Re: Border Trees

Postby MacadamB53 » Sat Sep 13, 2014 11:16 pm

Hi Rachael,

I've got kids and a dog so waiting sadly isn't an option

that's fair enough, if you'd have said this earlier - rather than mentioning conservation areas, TPOs and trying to foul up planning apps...

All the best, Mac
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Re: Border Trees

Postby oorya » Fri Sep 19, 2014 1:26 pm

In terms of planning, you could always object to overlooking. We did on a development next to our house and even though we didn't get the development stopped they had to put obscured glass in the upstairs windows even the bedroom.

As regards chopping down the trees, the planning department at our regional council didn't give a toss that a small orchard of apple and pear trees would be dug up and the ground covered in concrete. :(
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