non-grafted fruit trees

non-grafted fruit trees

Postby jdfi » Mon Oct 13, 2014 5:23 am

Hello,

I was after a couple of fruit trees, but all my local garden centre has are these fruit trees grafted onto something else.

Is it still possible to get 'fully authentic' fruit trees that aren't grafted onto other stock, please?

Thanks
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby MacadamB53 » Mon Oct 13, 2014 8:03 am

Hi jdfi,

"fruit trees" is a very general term and the answer to your query is "depends what fruit you're on about".

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby jdfi » Mon Oct 13, 2014 10:14 am

Good point. Let's say apple or pear?
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby Treeman » Mon Oct 13, 2014 7:25 pm

jdfi wrote:Hello,

I was after a couple of fruit trees, but all my local garden centre has are these fruit trees grafted onto something else.

Is it still possible to get 'fully authentic' fruit trees that aren't grafted onto other stock, please?

Thanks



Breeder have spent generations developing trees for the traits we desire, in doing this they disregard the root system which generally speaking becomes miserable and under developed but no matter.

The desirable traits can be grafted onto a vigorous root stock and all is well.

You wouldn't want to own a tree with a natural root stock.
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby jdfi » Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:10 am

Oh I see. So it's not anything weird - it will produce edible apples etc?
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby arborlad » Tue Oct 14, 2014 9:13 am

jdfi wrote:Hello,

I was after a couple of fruit trees, but all my local garden centre has are these fruit trees grafted onto something else.

Is it still possible to get 'fully authentic' fruit trees that aren't grafted onto other stock, please?

Thanks



All perfectly normal.

This question would be better asked at the garden centre where there should be knowledgeable staff who can answer, better still, go to a nursery that specialises in fruit trees.
arborlad

smile...it confuses people
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby Roblewis » Tue Oct 14, 2014 10:25 am

Fruit trees of specific varieties have to be reproduced on a rootstock for three, at least, prime reasons
1) Most varieties require at least two pollinators and thus do not come true from seed
2) Grafting rapidly produces many trees for commercial use and sale
3) Some varieties are so vigorous that they will simply grow rather than fruit well if on their own roots.

But arborlad is right - talk to your nursery but I think you will only find wild variety derivatives on their own stock. They are vey god for jelly making but eating is a no no :D
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby Mojisola » Tue Oct 14, 2014 1:17 pm

Treeman wrote:Breeder have spent generations developing trees for the traits we desire, in doing this they disregard the root system which generally speaking becomes miserable and under developed but no matter.

The desirable traits can be grafted onto a vigorous root stock and all is well.

You wouldn't want to own a tree with a natural root stock.


Most apples and pears are grafted for the opposite reason - to restrict the growth. Few people have the space for full-size trees in their gardens - they want dwarfed or semi-dwarfed trees but with the fruit varieties they like. The graft produces the desired fruit; the rootstock controls the growth of the tree.
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby Fairperson » Tue Oct 14, 2014 5:49 pm

Hi,

I have bought from this nursery, which has this useful page on choosing the right tree for your needs:
http://www.keepers-nursery.co.uk/choosi ... -trees.htm
If you click on the 'rootstock' section, it lists which rootstock you need to ask for, to grow a particular height of tree.

FP
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby Treeman » Tue Oct 14, 2014 7:16 pm

Mojisola wrote:
Treeman wrote:Breeder have spent generations developing trees for the traits we desire, in doing this they disregard the root system which generally speaking becomes miserable and under developed but no matter.

The desirable traits can be grafted onto a vigorous root stock and all is well.

You wouldn't want to own a tree with a natural root stock.


Most apples and pears are grafted for the opposite reason - to restrict the growth. Few people have the space for full-size trees in their gardens - they want dwarfed or semi-dwarfed trees but with the fruit varieties they like. The graft produces the desired fruit; the rootstock controls the growth of the tree.


No, they don't, root stock choice is just an option, they just go horizontal on the miserable natural root stock.
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby Fairperson » Wed Oct 15, 2014 10:23 am

Hi,

A bit more info. on rootstocks, 'natural' or otherwise: http://www.orangepippintrees.co.uk/arti ... ruit-trees
It' sounds like there's a network of people out there, interested in reviving this original practise.

FP
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Re: non-grafted fruit trees

Postby Clifford Pope » Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:31 pm

When I planted an orchard 30 years ago I bought the stock from somewhere on the Isle of Wight, I think.
They could supply trees grafted onto a range of rootstocks, but they have to be grafted onto something because ungrafted trees are just wild random seedlings that may not even produce fruit that is true to the apparent parentage.

As i recall M2 9or something like that) was the largest rootstock, and produces full size trees up to 30 feet high.
other M numbers produce miniatures.

The variety is determined by the tree grafted on top, the size and various other things determined by the rootstock.

"Natural" trees grown from pips might be anything - most like small, sour and wizzened.
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