TPO trees with overhanging branches

Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu Apr 09, 2015 6:43 pm

arsie wrote:Another far-fetched fantasy idea Mac well off at a tangent - but when did that ever stop you eh? :roll: :wink:
are you keeping a list? can I see it please... :D
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby arborlad » Thu Apr 09, 2015 6:48 pm

arsie wrote:Another far-fetched fantasy idea Mac well off at a tangent - but when did that ever stop you eh? :roll: :wink:



............and presumptuous as well........... 'but IMHO your question has been answered in full by the forum:.............not the first time.
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby arsie » Thu Apr 09, 2015 7:59 pm

er back off arborlad he did say it was his HUMBLE opinion ;)
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby ukmicky » Thu Apr 09, 2015 9:10 pm

TO


Is a tree officer likely to approve an application to reduce the growth of a tree covered by a TPO if only one side of the tree can be worked on.


Cutting it back only on one side surely would affect the visual amenity of the tree and would not fit in with why the tree had a TPO placed on it in the first place.

If it would not be good practise to allow such works would a letter the to tree officer making it known that no work will be permitted on the Ops side of the boundary be enough to prevent the developer gaining the permision is after.
Advice given is not legally qualified and you are advised to gain a professional opinion
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby trevors » Thu Apr 09, 2015 10:42 pm

Thanks.

I take on board all your comments. I'll speak to the Tree Officer and let you know what come of it.

T
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu Apr 09, 2015 11:00 pm

trevors wrote:Thanks.

I take on board all your comments. I'll speak to the Tree Officer and let you know what come of it.

T
Hi T,

all the best, Mac
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby APC » Fri Apr 10, 2015 10:00 pm

If the trees are reasonable specimens and to even fit the development in on that layout will require TPO'ed trees to be cut back by that amount, the LPA could resist it, if they had the stomach for it. You would expect there to be significant future pressure to prune, which could not realistically be objected to should planning permission be granted. I really can't say from that single photograph whether the trees should stand in the way of a new development as it really depends on how important those trees are. Some tpo'ed trees are collateral.
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby arsie » Fri Apr 10, 2015 10:33 pm

I would stick my neck out - and not meaning to cause offence to the OP - and say those trees don't look like well-kept specimens to me. The branches reaching out for the light over the developing construction work are straggly and there is no formed shape to the canopy that I can see (though admittedly the one photo doesn't show that.) Probably the sycamores are too close together. The trees in the foreground left and some in the near distance right all seem to have leaf growth round the lower trunk. Whether this is ivy or something else I can't see but if it is ivy that will be sapping the trees' strength. We often see that here in the country by the side of the road with trees that are not maintained. Ivy often thrives on plants that are neglected.

After some thought and on what evidence there is to see, my conclusion is that if the works quoted were in the tree survey that accompanied the successful planning application, I would see no real issue with the works going ahead.

Whatever I may have said earlier :)
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby arborlad » Fri Apr 10, 2015 10:46 pm

arsie wrote:Hi Trevor,
You need the http://www. prefix and to put the link inside URL tags, thus:

http://www.tinyurl.com/or4qvyt

Taking off half the length makes sense, given where they have placed the new buildings ...
Also, the trunks of the sycamore seem a bit overgrown. I wonder how healthy they are?



Can you resize the photo please, all I get is a bit of trunk and Herras fence.
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby trevors » Sat Apr 11, 2015 7:43 am

Here's a new shot looking east with my boundary on the right. Hope it's small enough for you to see the details. The vegetation within the site has partly been cleared from this end.

On my side there is a screen of laurel around the base of the sycamores.

T

http://tinyurl.com/nac8wst

or http://www.tinyurl.com/nac8wst
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby arsie » Sat Apr 11, 2015 9:06 am

Thanks Trevor.

The trees are quite tall aren't they. But above the laurel it looks like ivy has taken a hold. The laurel is no more or less demanding of water than the sycamore though the latter will have ensured by root spread that they get water.

Ivy within tree canopies can increase the shading effect. But it can hide structural defects that may develop as it makes visual tree inspections more difficult, as will the laurel. Ivy can also add to the wind resistance of the tree.

If any of the trees blew down and caused damage you could be held liable. I would ask via the council if the developers tree surgeons could report on tree condition while they're at it. Even if they say 'no' then at least you will have tried.

p.s.
The new pic is max size for me whereas the first one came up full screen with a '+' to magnify.
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby Treeman » Sat Apr 11, 2015 9:16 am

The trees in your latest picture have problems

They are significantly phototropic and under normal circumstances the neighbour would be entitled to remove what is a substantial encroachment

You have to face up to the fact that the neighbour is likely to want to do everything to reduce the trespass and that they are going to be granted consent for some significant works

Brace your self for some pruning. I you am pretty sure you aren't going to like it
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby Roblewis » Sat Apr 11, 2015 1:52 pm

Whilst agreeing with treeman I do feel that you could also benefit from the pruning that will take place as the canopy will thicken up over time. Trees always look their worst without leaves though with a few exceptions.
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby arborlad » Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:37 am

There does seem to be a significant need, not just for treework, but a new fence - lots of room for negotiation and compromise.
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Re: TPO trees with overhanging branches

Postby trevors » Tue Apr 14, 2015 9:30 am

I've now spoken on the phone to the Tree Officer. He works for the Local Council that approved the development in the first place so he has a vested interest to permit. We plan a site visit shortly.

He made the following comments of note:-

1. Any lopping would have to follow best arboricultural practices allowing for integrity, maintenance & stability of the tree.
2. No branches could be below head height as you walk along my boundary.
3. The new occupants should be allowed fair use of their garden space.

My questions would be:-

What aspect of best arboricultural practice would apply here? If we take TPO tree T51, it overhangs approx 12m into the gardens. What calculations would be used to say how much can be cut off? What are the risks in cutting off too much? I assume they'll have to use a cherry picker to do the work? Is that a reasonable assumption?

There are no branches below head height on my boundary. In fact over the years I've maintained the branches to at least 2.5-3m and have trimmed the laurel so that I can easily walk along the fence line. Looking over the new garden space it would appear that even the ends of the overhanging branches are still above head height at the edge of the canopy. Once the ends of the branches are cut off won't the whole branch spring up?
The plans show a 1.8m close boarded fence along the boundary.

The last point 3.above is an interesting one. With my 17 TPO trees I'll have 5 new neighbours. How do you quantify fair use?

I'll be most interested to hear your views.

Trevor
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