Neighbours leylandii tree

Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby Eliza » Sat May 21, 2016 4:24 pm

My NFH has planted a leylandii tree very close to my boundary wall (and not forever away from my house) since I moved here. I had nasty suspicions it was a leylandii (judging by how quickly its growing) and it has now been confirmed to me that that's what it is.

I'm obviously concerned that if it's left to grow steadily onwards by her (as I suspect will be the case) that my property will be at risk at some point. It's certainly the case its branches are going to come reaching over into my garden noticeably. I will obviously trim those branches back if (when!) it does come sideways into my garden (though, clearly, I won't be able to trim any that are taller than I am). I'm obviously concerned it will cast a shadow on the suntrap part of my garden too.

Knowing her - this is something she's probably done deliberately to cause trouble for me. Even if its not deliberately done for that reason - I expect she's quite pleased about this.

The two consoling points are:

- I can see the tips of some of the branches are browning and I know she likes to keep her plants looking nice. Hopefully she will realise the tree is steadily getting more "ill" (presumably with aphids or something that often attack these trees?) and might remove it anyway. Hopefully her wish for perfect-looking plants will be stronger than her wish to upset me??

- The gardener friend that confirmed what the tree is said "It will get her house before it gets yours" (ie it's nearer to her house than it is to mine). So she may "see sense" at some point if she feels her own house is threatened by it?

I'm not quite sure what to do about this tree - other than cross fingers and hope those aphids/whatever-it-is that is "browning" the tree hurry up and do a good job of ruining the look of it.

What would everyone else do?

BTW - just to make it more worrying - the soil in this area is clay.
Apologies for not giving exact personal details in my posts - you never know who is reading....
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby duvet » Sun May 22, 2016 3:46 am

how close?

just in case you read about the various ways you can assist a poor sickly leylandii tree on its way ;-)
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby Eliza » Sun May 22, 2016 6:04 am

There is a leylandii tree close to my last house that reached 15' tall and then went brown and died for some reason.

The nfh is quite capable of accusing me of all sorts - even if the tree stayed absolutely fine - so I'm rather wary of that. She would certainly have the police on my doorstep as quick as blink I'm sure and proceed to try and turn the other half of the locals in this small town against me (I've certainly had instances of feeling puzzled at how some people who dont even know me have had the attitude they have towards me - until I subsequently realised they are friends of hers and have adopted her opinion of me, rather than forming their own).

The tree is pretty inaccessible from my garden anyway.

A positive thought is it (its roots) are only about 2' away from a drain cover for her own drain in her garden - so I'm hoping the roots will go in that direction (presumably they get attracted towards water?) and block her drain. With any luck - whoever then unblocked it for her would tell her she needed to remove it for her own sake. Am I right in thinking those roots would "smell out" that water in her drain and grow towards it for their own nourishment?

Difficult situation.
Apologies for not giving exact personal details in my posts - you never know who is reading....
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby cleo5 » Sun May 22, 2016 8:19 pm

Don't worry about it Eliza. It may never happen.

As for roots I guess they must seek out water whether sideways or downwards. As you say if the roots damage her drains she'll soon have it down. New drains can be costly(speaking from experience of tree roots and drains,)

Just hope it dies or the UFN sees sense.
Guess you will have to pay someone to cut the branches back if they spread too far your way.

Folk plant a little tree and don't think ahead.
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby Eliza » Mon May 23, 2016 9:21 am

I do know a lot of people dont seem to think any further ahead than next week - or, if pushed, next year.

I admit to being very surprised she was so set on this that she didnt think ahead more than the next year or two. As I did think that - however bad she is (in many respects) - that she was more intelligent than to do something as daft as that from her own point of view. I am very surprised anyone would be that stupid (ie I had a neighbour to my last house that did the same thing - but it was clear he wasnt very bright as soon as I clapped eyes on him). This nfh is supposed to be an intelligent person!! The standard of workmanship of these houses is poor enough and her drain close enough that I would estimate there probably are cracks in that drain and the roots will get to it in not more than a year.

I do wonder whether I should write her an official precautionary letter ("putting her on Notice") to remove the tree - from the pov of just in case any damage should occur to my property ever because of her tree? If there should be any damage ever - then I would get onto my insurance company and expect them to get onto her insurance company to cover the cost. Or am I safe enough for claims from the fact that I was here before the tree was - ie I didnt buy my property with that tree already there. So I should think I'm "in the clear" for not having done any "contributory negligence" ever myself and all the cost of any damage would be covered by her insurer (not mine)?

If (when...) her branches come over the boundary - I will cut off what I can reach myself, but am not prepared to spend any of my money on her tree to cut any higher up branches.
Apologies for not giving exact personal details in my posts - you never know who is reading....
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby arborlad » Mon May 23, 2016 10:09 am

Eliza wrote:If (when...) her branches come over the boundary - I will cut off what I can reach myself, but am not prepared to spend any of my money on her tree to cut any higher up branches.




When you purchase a property with an outdoor space, there will be various tasks that have to be carried out, hedgecutting, grasscutting, weeding, and the pruning of trees and shrubs etc., some of which may be your own or belonging to a neighbour. When the tree first crosses the boundary, any potential cut will be the size of a pencil and well within the scope of a pair of secateurs, if you feel disinclined to make that cut - so be it. Some of these tasks will require the acquisition of new tools or new skills, all will require the expenditure of some time, effort and money and are collectively called gardening, if you don't like gardening - don't buy a house with a garden!
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby despair » Mon May 23, 2016 12:41 pm

Arborlad

its very unfair to suggest just because someone has a house with a garden they should have to bear the financial responsiility of the not inconsiderable expense of cutting back trees a neighbour has planted far too close to the boundary

theres many people who like a small garden but whoparticularily given last few years are struggling to exist on state pension and dwindling savings income

the costs of selling or moving are beyond their means

its long been time that those who grow trees must also be made fully responsible for maintaining them from blighting a neighbours life
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby Eliza » Mon May 23, 2016 12:59 pm

I fully agree Despair.

I've spent a LOT of my money on my own garden and accept that's part of having a garden. But that's on MY garden for MY benefit and I'm too responsible etc to even think of doing something that would potentially impact on neighbours gardens. I deal with mine - they deal with theirs is how I see it.

So there are two reasons I wouldnt spend money on a neighbours garden - its THEIR garden (not my responsibility then) and I cant afford it. My house and garden are costing me every penny I can afford as it is - without neighbours costing me money. As Despair said - many of us are on limited income and cant afford to bear other peoples expenses for them.
Apologies for not giving exact personal details in my posts - you never know who is reading....
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby arborlad » Mon May 23, 2016 1:56 pm

despair wrote:Arborlad ............its very unfair to suggest just because someone has a house with a garden they should have to bear the financial responsiility of the not inconsiderable expense of cutting back trees a neighbour has planted far too close to the boundary



You seem to be missing the point, currently, there is no problem, no considerable expense to bear. If and when it does become a problem, then 30 seconds with a pair of secateurs will cure it, Eliza seems to have taken the very entrenched view that she is not even prepared to do that - can we then look forward a decade and find the post from Eliza that says: 'I wish I'd used my secateurs ten years ago!'
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby Eliza » Mon May 23, 2016 2:01 pm

I thought I made it quite clear that I will be cutting what I personally can reach - as and when it comes over the wall.

What I cant do is cut the bits I cant reach personally - as that would mean paying someone else (that had the equipment to do branches reaching over to a height taller than myself). Or am I missing a trick here - ie that branches over say 5' from the ground stay extremely close to the trunk of the tree and wouldnt go reaching over my wall?
Apologies for not giving exact personal details in my posts - you never know who is reading....
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby despair » Tue May 24, 2016 8:29 am

Arborlad

I only wish that a snip with secateurs would quickly solve problems eliza is facing

Leylandi grow fast and whilst you might be able to balance on steps or ladders to cut overhang above 2 metres many many people cannot

I have had more than my fill of the problem and even long reach pruners have a limit and need 2 hands to operate one of which is likely need to keep hold of the ladder

Not everyone is young enough or has the balance to swing like a monkey through trees with chainsaw in hand as you may well be and tree surgeons are trained to do
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby cleo5 » Tue May 24, 2016 12:08 pm

Despair,
I agree completely.
Eliza,the problem is that is causing you stress and this harms the immune system and leaves you open to illness.

Yes, if you want to then write to neighbour asking them to check the safety of the tree and to check their insurance to ensure it covers the cost of damage to your property should it fall.
(There is no way of knowing which way a leylandii can fall in high wind or disease).
Send it recorded delivery and keep a copy.

Next , write to local council with your concerns over this tree, just to stir things up. Check first if local council tree man charges to come out(ours charges over £300) If free then get him to come and check and voice your concerns.

Look at the topic where flat owner is obliged to cut branches of a similar tree to yours because they are leaning over neighbouring land/ building.
In that case the council didn't even come out as far as we know. Just wrote telling him to do it.

I too have a similar problem a whole line of the wretched things some 35 ft high plus enormous ash trees and other that lean right over my garden and a treeman quoted £3000 + to lop branches but says trees are diseased and need to be removed.
This neighbour has caused me such stress I am now very unwell and there is nothing I can do.

You need have no verbal contact with NFN . He/she has been warned.
And think the tree may die soon( a little copper sulphate around the roots, if a root should poke it's way anywhere near you might hasten its death)
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby arborlad » Wed May 25, 2016 6:48 am

despair wrote:Arborlad I only wish that a snip with secateurs would quickly solve problems eliza is facing



Apologies, I'd obviously underestimated the magnitude of the problem.............
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby arborlad » Wed May 25, 2016 10:53 am

cleo5 wrote:Look at the topic where flat owner is obliged to cut branches of a similar tree to yours because they are leaning over neighbouring land/ building.
In that case the council didn't even come out as far as we know. Just wrote telling him to do it.



I think this may be the topic you are referring to: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=20283 .............very different circumstances and not quite as you've described it.
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Re: Neighbours leylandii tree

Postby Uriah Heap » Sun May 29, 2016 1:00 am

Its all very well cutting a overhanging laylandii with sececers when its just 5 foot tall, but unfortunately your not allowed to cut the top off and when it eventually gets to 30 foot tall it becomes much more of a problem. I has seven of the buggers to cope with between 25 and 40 foot high and its no joke.
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