Incontinence pads

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Incontinence pads

Postby gardenlaw » Tue Aug 10, 2010 5:05 pm

I have recently come across this horror warning/story

WARNING - do not read this whilst eating or drinking!
>
> I have recently come across an appalling practice where incontinent clients are allocated a fixed number of incontinence pads per day.
> The calculation is based upon total urine output over a 24 hour period - yes the used pads are kept and weighed to make the calculation!
> Since each pad has an absorbency of 800ml, the total output for the day is divided by 800 to calculate the number of pads "required".
> I understand that the average full bladder contains between 400 - 500ml and the healthy adult will visit the loo every 3 - 4 hours or so.
> Therefore assuming that the person does manage to fill their bladder they will have a 3 - 4 hour wait with a wet pad before they go again and be entitled to a clean pad.
> Of course in practice our incontinent client is unlikely to be able to control their bladders in this way and will probably go quite regularly.
> Thus they are likely to be wet most of the time.
>
> I am also advised that the assessment is repeated whenever a person moves and takes 4 weeks to process - during which period there is no entitlement to pads at all.
> My lady had been in a residential home, was admitted to hospital who had no record of her needing pads so there were non available for her and now she has been discharged to another care home and needs to wait again.
> Needless to say - in my capacity as attorney, I visited the local health
centre and bought her 6 packs of 28 pads to keep her going! My lady was
virtually in tears when I delivered them to her.
> I have also advised the home that if she needs more pads to keep her changed each time then I will buy her more.
>
> Has anyone else come across this? I am seeking to find out if this is local to my PCT in Derbyshire or a nationwide policy?
>
> I could not believe that pads were not available throughout all homes and hospitals for use as needed - like plasters and dressings. As my clients keep telling me - its no fun getting old.
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Postby w3526602 » Sat Oct 16, 2010 3:54 pm

Hi,

Not quite the same thing. My mother in law was entitled to a waterproof sheet to sit on ..... one per day.

I would collect them from the Health Centre. Nurse would open a pack of 50, remove 22 (leaving 28) and say that was her supply for four weeks.

Only when we got them home, and counted them, there would usually only be about 20. So she (or we) went short, and presumably the contractor supplying the sheets made a profit out of the sheets he didm't supply.

602
602 (That was my "last three")
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