Are you affected by hose and sprinkler Ban ?

Postby Conveyancer » Thu Apr 13, 2006 11:52 pm

Me wrote:There is a need to conserve water -- but HM Govt aren't coming clean about the reasons. They couldn't embarrass Two-Jags by admitting that his crazy escalation of house-building in the south east means that everyone else has to use less water.


And so the fact that the South of England has been experiencing the driest period since 1933 has got absolutely nothing to do with it?

All the talk about new houses causing a water shortage is just an excuse to attack the government's social objective of providing new homes, which is entirely laudable. I can just imagine what the press would make of an announcement that all new home building was to be banned so that people with gardens can water their dahlias. They would suddenly start pointing to the lack of rain.
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Postby Me » Fri Apr 14, 2006 12:25 am

The 'drought' is over. Reservoirs and underground resources were replenished in February and March (helped by the cold spring weather and the late hibernation of trees and flora). And to suggest that gardeners make any difference at all when they use less than 1% of abstracted water is just wrong.
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Postby Conveyancer » Fri Apr 14, 2006 12:45 am

I have just resolved to keep to the law on this site.
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Store our water - we don't need to "conserve" it

Postby Alan Harris » Sat Oct 14, 2006 1:01 am

Dear All

As a chartered civil engineer I am far from convinced that this year's hosepipe ban was justified. In a wet country like ours there is no shortage of water We just need to store it when ir is falling and get it to the parts of the country which need it when they need it. The big water companies are only interested in profit and should be required to deal with the public's needs first. When Birmingham needed water it did a deal with owners in wales build reservoirs and simply pumped the required water.
There are in my mind good reasons to lift any monopoly powers from the water companies and allow and encourage private land owners to store and treat water for sale . The big water companies see water provisions in grand terms and meet (rightly) massive opposition to massive schemes such as large reservoirs and desalinization.
What about smaller land owners storing moderate quantities on private land and making the amenity available at a charge to the public for fishing, boating and other uses. Water could be pumped up to locations without sufficient rainfall from locations which do have surplus water with the pumping powered by wind coincidentally at the time of year when the water is in excess.
The cost of water could come down and the availability of amenities for recreation would go up.
It is rediculous for one of the richest wettest countries in the world to claim that we cannot get enough water that we have to ban hoses avery few years and expect everyone to use watering cans or buy arid climate plants for our gardens instead. This is nothing to do with global warming and is all to do with greed profit and power. And for the green lobby, you may like a sackcloth and ashes lifestyle and it may help people to believe in conservation of everything else but we do not need to reduce the volume flushing down the loo or bath together or save the washing up water for the garden we merely need to manage our water when the rain is falling and save it up for when it is not. A but like Moses in Egypt who saved the corn for the seven good years and used it for the seven poor years. Not exactly a new concept eh.

best regards


Alan Harris
Alan is a consulting engineer specialising in subsidence, tree roots, soils and party wall surveying.
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Re: Store our water - we don't need to "conserve"

Postby Maverick.uk » Sat Oct 14, 2006 1:48 pm

Alan Harris wrote: What about smaller land owners storing moderate quantities on private land and making the amenity available at a charge to the public for fishing, boating and other uses.


On the other hand we could also get them to use some of their profits to fix the leaks they have in the system......That would be a good start!

Cheers

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The drought

Postby Alan Harris » Sat Oct 14, 2006 4:38 pm

Dear Mav

Yes fix the leaks as well.

I cannot fathom the philosophy which justifies handing the water utility over to a monopoly in the private sector. The market works because of competition and how is that satisfied by present arrangements. Telephone calls and the internet share cables as do the power companies share the power net. Why shouldn't the water suppliers supply water through the same pipes and share the cost of maintenance. If competion and market forces is the basic philosophywhy can't we go the whole way with water supply. Treatment could also be a common resource provided and maintaied by competing firms!

If the object of being in the water industry was to make a profit then there should be a requirement for the water companies to provide all of the water required by the public without having the excuse of drough conditions during which the income keeps coming in but they do not have to save the water lost in leakage, cheaper for them to avoid leak repairs and reduce supplies than to use up the shareholders dividends and lose share value especially if you are Thames water keen to sell out and make a quick killing.

Water is a long term industry not based on short term policies designed to satisfy the short term interests of the share market. The governmant should get real and reorganise the water industry in favour of the water users.

A bit of a rant but we should all have access to water as of right.

Yours sincerely



Alan Harris
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