Boundary Fence Issue

Boundary Fence Issue

Postby TiredNeighbour » Thu Apr 17, 2014 1:56 pm

My neighbour owns the boundary fence between our houses and doesn't want to spend money to have it repaired. The fence panels are bowed out towards me as she stores wood for her burner there and I have asked her to remove it several times which she has ignored. One of the large fence posts is rotten at the bottom and the only thing thing that's been keeping it straight is my recycling bin being propped up against it. She then decided that my hanging basket on her fence (which she never had a problem with in the past) was an issue and tried to saw it down late one night. Her behaviour has become increasingly erratic and she seems unable to discuss any issue in a reasonable manner so I can see her becoming more and more difficult. To this end I have decided to put up my own 2m fence on my side of the boundary but the problem is that she erected a shed last year and the roof overhangs the current smaller fence. I agreed to it at the time to be neighbourly but it now stops me putting up my own fence.

My questions are:

What can I do if she refuses to move her shed
How close can I put my fence to the existing fence
What if her fence falls against mine and damages it

Any input would be greatly appreciated.
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Re: Boundary Fence Issue

Postby Hugh Jaleak » Thu Apr 17, 2014 5:22 pm

If there really is no option but to put your own fence up in parallel with the existing fence, then go ahead. You can erect a new fence tight against the existing, the neighbour has no control over that. I'd look at using concrete posts, put up properly they will happily hold the weight of your fence and the neighbours (or the remains of) as well. If her shed is an issue, either miss that section of new fence out, (leave the correct gap between posts to allow retrofitting of (a) fence panel(s) at a later date, or drop in a lower height panel, e.g 3 or 4 ft high as opposed to 6ft high.

Concrete posts, although not so cheap to buy in the first instance, have the inherent advantage of strength, and wont rot. Panels can simply be replaced over the years as required, although fitting of a 6" concrete gravel board under the panel keeps the moisture out of the base of the wooden panels anyway. Let her fence rot away, downside is however, you lose a couple of inches of garden. Otherwise your alternative is dialogue!
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Re: Boundary Fence Issue

Postby despair » Thu Apr 17, 2014 5:31 pm

you need to stagger your posts in between her wood posts so as not to loose ground or fight concrete bases

the big problem will be where her panels are bowed thanks to wood being piled up against them plus the damp that will then affect your panels at that point too

I would be tempted to encourage the entire mess to fall into your garden and then throw it all back before you think about spending money

if her shed has no guttering and overhangs the run off will also damage your new fence

sometimes a blazing row with such neighbours is only way fwd
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Re: Boundary Fence Issue

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu Apr 17, 2014 5:47 pm

Hi Tired,

there really is no option but to put your own fence up in parallel with the existing fence

Is this true?

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: Boundary Fence Issue

Postby TiredNeighbour » Fri Apr 18, 2014 3:08 pm

Thank you all for your advice. I'm afraid there is no other option but to put up my own fence as I know that even if she replaces her fence she will not give me permission to paint it on my side. I've lived here for 18 years and had 4 different neighbours but she is the only one who has caused such problems and just refuses to be reasonable.

Thanks again for the help :)
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Re: Boundary Fence Issue

Postby MacadamB53 » Fri Apr 18, 2014 7:57 pm

Hi Tired,

Have you considered telling her of your intentions and asking if she'd like her old fence taking down as part of the job?

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: Boundary Fence Issue

Postby TiredNeighbour » Sat Apr 19, 2014 5:12 pm

Hi Mac,

She won't even share costs to replace the fence on the existing boundary, which is something I've done with my past two neighbours. Now to make matters worse I've just had a visit from the neighbours on the other side of her today who are awaiting delivery of their new fence but because they haven't moved quickly enough for her she has nailed bamboo panels onto their existing fence posts!
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Re: Boundary Fence Issue

Postby MacadamB53 » Sat Apr 19, 2014 8:41 pm

Hi Tired,

She won't even share costs to replace the fence on the existing boundary

I'm not sure I follow - either a fence on her land or a fence on your land and no fence on "the boundary" (boundaries are invisible lines where two lands meet). Neither of you need to share the cost of fencing the other's land and there's nothing wrong with her choosing to say "no".

which is something I've done with my past two neighbours

paid half towards their fence, or asked them to pay half towards yours?

I've just had a visit from the neighbours on the other side of her... ...she has nailed bamboo panels onto their existing fence posts

this won't present a problem - they can just take their old fence down as planned. they just need to ensure the bamboo doesn't sustain any undue damage before they return it to her.

I was not advocating you ask her for any money. I suggested you tell her you plan to erect a fence some time soon and ask her if she wants her old fence removing whilst you're at it.

Kind regards, Mac
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