Shared boundary fence near collapse

Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby Caked132 » Wed May 21, 2014 8:04 pm

Hi everyone.

I have a problem with the boundary fence that's shared between mine and my neighbours properties at the back of our respective gardens that separate our houses from the street behind.

My neighbour's property is owned by an individual who sublets the rooms to tenants. I used to see him regularly about once a week until about three years ago. Since then I haven't seen him once.

Over the last three years, my neighbour's property has become increasingly less well maintained and the back garden has been allowed to overgrow. However once a year a team of gardeners have been mowing the grass and this is where the problems have arisen.

These gardeners have been depositing the cut grass against the fence at the back of my neighbour's garden. Over time (with the rain etc.) has led to the fence being pushed backwards and has now split. In particular they have been depositing grass against the fence post in the corner of the neighbours garden next to mine so that it's lying at about a 45 degree angle. The panel between the fence post in my neighbours garden (about 2 feet in) and my garden (about 6 feet) has sheared on my side and I've had to stop the fence from falling by nailing a piece of wood to my fence post and the fence.

The gardeners returned on Monday this week for its annual cut and again preceded to deposit the grass against the buckling fence. When I spotted them doing this, I asked them not to but they simply ignored my request and carried on.

I'm now concerned that another period of heavy rain will see the my fence collapse completely.

I've been unable to contact my neighbour, I've put notes in the door and spoken to various tenants and although they say he's aware. There's been no action at all to remedy the situation.

I'm not sure which way to turn.

I certainly can't afford to repair or replace the whole fence and to be fair as I'm not responsible for any of this damage, I don't feel that I should.

I could though, rip down the panel that's effecting my garden, erect a fence post on my boundary and just renew that panel but that doesn't seem ideal and would also leave the two foot gap between the new fence and the leaning post in my neighbour's garden.

Also, as this is worrying me the most, in the short term would I be within my rights to climb into my neighbour's garden with a rake and move the grass away from the adjoining fence panel?

If anyone could offer me some advice as to how I could proceed I would be most grateful.

C
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby despair » Wed May 21, 2014 8:21 pm

If it was me i would sure go into the garden and abate the nuiscance being caused by his gardeners piling grass against the fence

push the fence back up and get some free pallets from somewhere and use those to shore up the situation your side

with a bit of ingenuity pallets can be fixed together to make a fence

not ideal but if thats all you can afford its better than nothing
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby MacadamB53 » Wed May 21, 2014 9:08 pm

Hi C,

who owns the fence the gardeners are piling the grass up against?

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby Caked132 » Thu May 22, 2014 8:39 am

Thanks despair, I'm going to clear the grass away later today.

MacadamB53 - The fence runs right along the back of our two properties. According to the deeds, I'm only responsible for the portion of fence on my property. The grass has been stockpiled against the fence on my neighbour's side. However this one fence panel straddles both properties with a fence post five feet along my boundary and about 2 to 3 feet along my neighbours. Most of the grass has been deposited against that fence post on my neighbour's property causing it to push back. This in turn has caused the panel to shear at the points that joins the fence post along my boundary.
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby Brainsey » Thu May 22, 2014 9:06 am

That does seem to be a rather odd installation with no fence post at the boundary to separate the fence into sections belonging to you and your (absent) landlord neighbour: a result of a joint job I expect.

I would look to protecting and repairing your own fence and do what you propose - erect a new post at the boundary and replace your single panel. Let your neighbour or the unhelpful gardeners worry about the two foot gap.

Caked132 wrote:I could though, rip down the panel that's effecting my garden, erect a fence post on my boundary and just renew that panel but that doesn't seem ideal and would also leave the two foot gap between the new fence and the leaning post in my neighbour's garden.

C
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu May 22, 2014 9:29 am

Hi C,

...with a fence post five feet along my boundary and about 2 to 3 feet along my neighbours...

fence panels are typically six foot in length, but I get the gist.

tell the neighbour you've got a solution:

buy a new panel and ask for it to be cut to size so you have two smaller panels - erect fence post - attach panels.

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby Brainsey » Thu May 22, 2014 10:06 am

MacadamB53 wrote:buy a new panel and ask for it to be cut to size so you have two smaller panels - erect fence post - attach panels.

Kind regards, Mac

A more magnanimous solution than mine and so probably the better one and obviously would be better received by the neighbour. :)
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby despair » Thu May 22, 2014 10:13 am

Get 4 pallets knock them into a compost bin on the errant neighbours side
transfer the grass into that and thus protect your new panels

you could also use the old panel as double protection between the pallet bin and your new fence panel or better still aquire a latrge peice of corrugated iron from freecycle/freegle and use that to protect back of your new panel
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu May 22, 2014 10:35 am

Hi C,

Get 4 pallets knock them into a compost bin on the errant neighbours side
transfer the grass into that and thus protect your new panels


or, as it sounds like your neighbour neglects their garden, why not have them tip the cuttings over into a compost heap on your side - free compost material!

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby Caked132 » Thu May 22, 2014 11:53 pm

Thanks all so much for your suggestions. I didn't get a chance to go over and remove the grass today as I had an essay to finish. I think I'm going to take Brainsey's advice and just concentrate on a replacement panel with a new post at the boundary corner.
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby MacadamB53 » Fri May 23, 2014 12:14 am

Hi C,

from what you've described the panel you need will have to be cut to size.
it makes sense, to me at least, that you may as well get this done from a full-size panel because the offcut will be just right for the gap on your neighbour's side.

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby Brainsey » Fri May 23, 2014 7:27 am

MacadamB53 wrote: that you may as well get this done from a full-size panel because the offcut will be just right for the gap on your neighbour's side.

Kind regards, Mac

Not quite Mac. The current panel, which we both presume is 6ft long, fits the gap but the overall length of the two cut parts of panel will add up to a (new) post width (presume 4") short of 6ft.

C will need to transfer the panel end battens or add new ones. In the past I've found it easiest to fix the battens first at the correct distance and then cut the panel but the exact process depends on the design of the panel.
Donating the off-cut to the neighbour may be a good move but I suspect that if C doesn't fit the part panel it will languish next to the grass pile.
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby MacadamB53 » Fri May 23, 2014 8:08 am

Hi Brainsey,

Not quite Mac.

I know, but I hope the OP gets my drift.

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby Caked132 » Fri May 23, 2014 9:17 am

It's not a standard fence panel. The fence is (was) pretty much like this one:

Image
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Re: Shared boundary fence near collapse

Postby Brainsey » Fri May 23, 2014 9:43 am

Ah, a picture paints. :)

You referred to a fence panel in your OP and again here:
Caked132 wrote:Thanks all so much for your suggestions. I didn't get a chance to go over and remove the grass today as I had an essay to finish. I think I'm going to take Brainsey's advice and just concentrate on a replacement panel with a new post at the boundary corner.

so we've been under the impression that it was a panel fence, hence our presumption those panels were 6ft long.

A feather board fence will be simpler to repair and you should be able to salvage and re-use some of the boards and arris rail.
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