fencing and planting near it.

fencing and planting near it.

Postby manitz » Thu Mar 17, 2016 1:07 pm

we bought a house from a relative 3 years ago. the relative lived there 35 years. The neighbour is old and tired as is his fence.

one panel fell in. I'm not overly bothered as we have no pets and the kids don't stray much so I didn't bother mentioning it. he has emerged for summer and has just told me he has to replace four panels, 2 of them because my relative planted too close to the fence which has wrecked it and a third because of another of our bushes - I think the bush/tree thing is more than 25 years old and the fence looks older. Weve just removed2 other bushes but were planning to keep this one because its quite nice. I think he's just lonely and this is his way of sharing his life with me but, as with a lot of his conversations, he's laying blame at my door and it's mildly threatening. He's very wealthy and I am not planning to offer him help paying to repair his fence - I'm not even sure that's what the conversation was about.

What I am wondering about is if there really is a rule that you can't plant within 35 cm of the bottom of the fence? I've never heard of this and google isn't helping but if there's a rule I will observe it with future planting. Are you supposed to cut things like ceonothus back so it doesn't touch the fence? that seems tricky to be on guard for that sort of thing and require a lot more gardening than I have time for, I'm not sure I have ever lived next door to anyone who observed it.
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu Mar 17, 2016 1:38 pm

Hi manitz,

What I am wondering about is if there really is a rule that you can't plant within 35 cm of the bottom of the fence?

no there isn't - you can plant anywhere you like in your garden.

Are you supposed to cut things like ceonothus back so it doesn't touch the fence?

it would be sensible (and neighbourly) to trim any plants so that they don't encroach onto the fence.
this is because the fence is his property and if the encroachment causes any damage then you will be liable.
(I imagine you'd have something to say if eg a tree in his garden was damaging you car?)

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby manitz » Thu Mar 17, 2016 1:41 pm

thanks mac. he quoted some rule about planting no closer than 35 cm or inches from a fence. I thought that sounded unlikely.
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu Mar 17, 2016 1:44 pm

Hi manitz,

give him the benefit of the doubt, and he was merely referring to a 'rule of thumb'.

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby manitz » Thu Mar 17, 2016 1:51 pm

He's had the benefit of quite a lot of my doubts! tbh he's a great neighbour but I think he might be angling to have this mature shrub/bush/tree thing out and it's the only thing we kept in the bed so it will look very bare without it. we already removed a lot of plants he wanted gone which is why the fence fell in a bit further up as they were holding it up.
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby despair » Thu Mar 17, 2016 4:04 pm

In my neck of the woods he would be lucky if any fence posts no matter how well installed lasted longer than 10 years

as for his you cant plant with 35cm what a twallop he is

all you should not do is allow ivy or climbers to grow up it or allow shrubs /trees to put pressure on it
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu Mar 17, 2016 4:27 pm

Hi manitz,

he might be angling to have this mature shrub/bush/tree thing out... ...we already removed a lot of plants he wanted gone which is why the fence fell in a bit further up as they were holding it up.

or, put another way, his fence was damaged by your plants - as evidenced by its collapse when you removed the plants - so to avoid any further damage it might be reasonable to assume he'll want you to remove the remaining shrub (which is already growing against his property?).

Kind regards, Mac
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby Collaborate » Thu Mar 17, 2016 7:13 pm

MacadamB53 wrote:or, put another way, his fence was damaged by your plants - as evidenced by its collapse when you removed the plants - so to avoid any further damage it might be reasonable to assume he'll want you to remove the remaining shrub (which is already growing against his property?).

Kind regards, Mac


Bit of a leap of faith Mac.

A bush or plant (save for ivy or similar) exerting pressure on a fence is unlikely to cause its collapse on removal. In my opinion and experience at least.
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby manitz » Mon May 09, 2016 4:26 pm

hi, thanks for your comments, i wasn't ignoring them just dont get on here much. It is possible that my plant damaged the fence at the other end of the garden but I know he had a rotten shed next to same fence board in previous years so I think it's more likely that did the majority of the damage, that and the fact that it was a very cheap fence with no boards at the bottom - can't remember what they are called. The fence all the way along has bricks under it to hold it up from the earth, it is pretty shoddy and has collapsed in several places where I have no plants.

Anyway I don't care if there's a fence there or not. We don't have animals and my kids don't escape. Neighbour is unwell and doesn't go in his garden so he doesn't really need it either. I just wanted to know if the 35cm thing was true. If we've done something wrong I'd rectify it.
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby despair » Mon May 09, 2016 6:29 pm

Some people aquire really crazy ideas on how close you can plant to a fence along with how long fence posts last

In my area I have not known even the best Tannalised posts to last 5 years hence why I install metposts

The easy answer in your situation is get chain link on metal posts installed if you can and ignore the old guy knowing that you have secured your boundary and retained your plants
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby manitz » Tue May 10, 2016 10:14 am

Its not the posts, they are concrete and fine (it's his boundary not mine). It's the panels which are overlap. He is getting the one which blew down replaced and a couple of others where the tops have broken off (those two are intact elsewhere just a bit scruffy). we are not talking about a lot of money or a lot of work or even something I'm overly bothered about as I don't care if there' s a fence or not. Just wondered if there was any truth to the 35 cm rule and also if I ought to be cutting the back of my bushes (it seems I should). I don't train things on other peoples fences anyway though I'd love to as it's the sunniest bit...

I agree that he's being unrealistic about how long overlap with no gravel board is going to last. Working it out it must be 30 years old and I would have thought it's done pretty well and, therefore, that its unlikely my plants have been responsible. I just find people dont accept that there is a cost to general maintenance of a property and my neighbour likes a bit of a grumble.
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby manitz » Wed May 18, 2016 10:47 am

the neighbour has just chopped the whole plant down it was a bush about 6 or 7 foot high and is now about 1.5 feet high. It was no longer touching his fence and none was hanging over. he is an old man who is ill but i have nothing stopping the whole street looking into my garden. they came onto my land and chopped down a tree which is about 20 cm within my boundary Does anyone have any advice for me that enables me to maintain a civil relationship with him. I am really upset and angry at the moment so I have come back inside and don't intend to discuss it further with him at this point.
manitz
 
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby manitz » Wed May 18, 2016 11:09 am

ok, i have decided what i'm going to do. he told me he spoke to his solicitor and the solicitor said this was fine. I now want to write him a letter which states the legal facts and explains that it was not legal to do this and if he does it again he will be in breach of the law and I will act. Can anyone suggest any wording?
Thanks I have pictures if anyone wants to check how objective I'm being.
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby arborlad » Wed May 18, 2016 11:24 am

manitz wrote:Its not the posts, they are concrete and fine (it's his boundary fence not mine).



Provided this can be verified, simply donating some panels and gravel boards to the neighbour is likely to be more effective and less costly than a solicitors letter.
arborlad

smile...it confuses people
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Re: fencing and planting near it.

Postby manitz » Wed May 18, 2016 11:35 am

thanks. i have just spoken to some more relaxed relatives and decided that in the interest of neighbourly harmony I'm going to suck it up and not do anything. ultimately i dont want any more of my trees destroyed but there aren't many left on that side and i think it's unlikely to happen again. He can't give me my plant back as it was so what is the point of writing a rude letter. I wasn't going to get a solicitor to write it but just state what has happened and the relevant law as he doesn't seem to understand it.
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