Fencing question

Re: Fencing question

Postby despair » Tue Jul 12, 2016 3:26 pm

I doubt the land registry /meausurents will help anything

the fact remains the fence line is not straight and that's down to the fencer who is trying to evade the issue
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Re: Fencing question

Postby George.K. » Tue Jul 12, 2016 5:40 pm

despair wrote:I doubt the land registry /meausurents will help anything

the fact remains the fence line is not straight and that's down to the fencer who is trying to evade the issue


Well I've got the land registry paperwork that you get with all your mortgage bits and pieces that that just shows the shape, no measurements. So not sure if this is the same information that he is looking to obtain.

I think my plan is to buy a laser and try and see if I can decipher a straight line to see how early on it starts to go wrong. I've also used the pic taken from above and done a couple of different versions - to show how a straight fence should run from the starting position - a bit like dot to dot! lol.

I will give it a few days and then request for the landlords email address again. He didn't give it to me - just seems to prefer to turn up unannounced. So frustrating that people will just not listen and look at what I am saying.

It's quite sad as despite all the things I was unhappy with, the only thing I wanted was for the last post to be shifted into where it should be. All the other wonky posts could stay. I just wanted to make sure that further down the line I was covered in case someone else wanted to change the fence and make it straight - they would obviously use the current/wrong positioning of the end post. Now the fence guy has really annoyed me, and looking at my beautiful diagrams, he owes next door land as well as me - so should the landlord want it done properly, there are quite a few posts to move rather than just the one. In fact, had the guy come over and just been straight and said look I couldn't get it in because there shed is in the way and I can try and move it over a bit more but it's a hassle, I might have even turned a blind eye. My issue now is not only his bad workmanship but more importantly his attitude.
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Re: Fencing question

Postby George.K. » Tue Jul 12, 2016 11:55 pm

Sorry everyone, this is completely unrelated to my post but a general question about fences. Can you attach concrete posts directly to your house?

I just saw a brief comment somewhere saying advisable to use wood against the house. JUst wondering if this is right and why?
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Re: Fencing question

Postby despair » Wed Jul 13, 2016 7:19 am

You can do anything you like

whether its advisable or not is another matter
Arborlad probably knows the answer
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Re: Fencing question

Postby George.K. » Wed Jul 13, 2016 8:25 am

despair wrote:You can do anything you like

whether its advisable or not is another matter
Arborlad probably knows the answer


I was just wondering what the proper way is? I've noticed quite a few fences with concrete posts, but the post joining to the house is always wood. Just wondered why.

Also, someone else just pointed out something to me - is there a right way and wrong side for overlapped fence panels i.e. which way is upside down - if any any?
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Re: Fencing question

Postby Collaborate » Wed Jul 13, 2016 9:22 am

I would advise against only moving the end post. This is not your problem to sort out. It is your neighbour's. Leaving some posts in your garden would effectively cede ownership of part of your garden to your neighbour.

My suggestion is you give your neighbour a month to resolve it, after which you remove the offending posts yourself at his cost. Then get a fencer in to do just that. Pay the fencer and recover the cost from the neighbour in the county court, small claims track.

He would be leaving you with no other option.
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Re: New neighbour, new fence

Postby arborlad » Wed Jul 13, 2016 11:31 am

George.K. wrote: What I am saying is if that line is followed through the rest of the garden, to me it looks as though the natural finish point will be near enough around the slat where the original post was fixed.



It sounds like you have a featheredge fence at the end of your garden and there is a witness mark on that fence which can be used to identify where the original post was fixed, is that correct?
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Re: New neighbour, new fence

Postby George.K. » Wed Jul 13, 2016 11:56 am

arborlad wrote:
George.K. wrote: What I am saying is if that line is followed through the rest of the garden, to me it looks as though the natural finish point will be near enough around the slat where the original post was fixed.



It sounds like you have a featheredge fence at the end of your garden and there is a witness mark on that fence which can be used to identify where the original post was fixed, is that correct?


Yes, that's right. I have lots of markings AND photographs to show exactly where the old post was attached. The fence guy tried to say that because the old post was a "baton" as he called it, it didn't count as proof of a boundary... even though to me it looked like the original fencing - when the houses were built they all had small fencing in between gardens. The posts have only gotten taller as people have been replacing them.
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Re: New neighbour, new fence

Postby George.K. » Wed Jul 13, 2016 12:01 pm

arborlad wrote:
George.K. wrote: What I am saying is if that line is followed through the rest of the garden, to me it looks as though the natural finish point will be near enough around the slat where the original post was fixed.



It sounds like you have a featheredge fence at the end of your garden and there is a witness mark on that fence which can be used to identify where the original post was fixed, is that correct?


Also, forgot to say - I paint my fence a different colour to their's which has made things really handy to see where my garden was and now is lol.
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Re: Fencing question

Postby arborlad » Wed Jul 13, 2016 12:32 pm

George.K. wrote:So... landlord said he would apparently contact land register for measurements. Should I be doing anything else in the meantime or leave it with him.



Unless that boundary has been determined - and you would both know that, he wont get anything more definitive than you already have.

This, along with a brick being removed from your patio and a post where you once stood are far more compelling evidence:

George.K. wrote:
arborlad wrote:
George.K. wrote: What I am saying is if that line is followed through the rest of the garden, to me it looks as though the natural finish point will be near enough around the slat where the original post was fixed.



It sounds like you have a featheredge fence at the end of your garden and there is a witness mark on that fence which can be used to identify where the original post was fixed, is that correct?


Also, forgot to say - I paint my fence a different colour to their's which has made things really handy to see where my garden was and now is lol.
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Re: Fencing question

Postby arborlad » Wed Jul 13, 2016 5:33 pm

George.K. wrote:I was just wondering what the proper way is? I've noticed quite a few fences with concrete posts, but the post joining to the house is always wood. Just wondered why.



Most post holes require a depth of two feet, if you tried to dig to that depth alongside a house you would reach footings first, the usual way to overcome this is with a 4"x2" wallplate fixed to the wall.





Also, someone else just pointed out something to me - is there a right way and wrong side for overlapped fence panels i.e. which way is upside down - if any any?



Panel fences tend to be a bit anonymous, if it were a featheredge fence it should have the posts and rails on the owners side.
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Re: Fencing question

Postby George.K. » Wed Jul 13, 2016 7:19 pm

arborlad wrote:
George.K. wrote:I was just wondering what the proper way is? I've noticed quite a few fences with concrete posts, but the post joining to the house is always wood. Just wondered why.



Most post holes require a depth of two feet, if you tried to dig to that depth alongside a house you would reach footings first, the usual way to overcome this is with a 4"x2" wallplate fixed to the wall.





Also, someone else just pointed out something to me - is there a right way and wrong side for overlapped fence panels i.e. which way is upside down - if any any?



Panel fences tend to be a bit anonymous, if it were a featheredge fence it should have the posts and rails on the owners side.


What do wall plates look like/made of? Can you see if one has been fitted?
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Re: Fencing question

Postby arborlad » Wed Jul 13, 2016 7:36 pm

George.K. wrote:
arborlad wrote:
George.K. wrote:I was just wondering what the proper way is? I've noticed quite a few fences with concrete posts, but the post joining to the house is always wood. Just wondered why.



Most post holes require a depth of two feet, if you tried to dig to that depth alongside a house you would reach footings first, the usual way to overcome this is with a 4"x2" wallplate fixed to the wall.





Also, someone else just pointed out something to me - is there a right way and wrong side for overlapped fence panels i.e. which way is upside down - if any any?



Panel fences tend to be a bit anonymous, if it were a featheredge fence it should have the posts and rails on the owners side.


What do wall plates look like/made of? Can you see if one has been fitted?




https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=timbe ... vAFN2GM%3A
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Re: Fencing question

Postby George.K. » Wed Jul 13, 2016 8:03 pm

Most post holes require a depth of two feet, if you tried to dig to that depth alongside a house you would reach footings first, the usual way to overcome this is with a 4"x2" wallplate fixed to the wall.





Also, someone else just pointed out something to me - is there a right way and wrong side for overlapped fence panels i.e. which way is upside down - if any any?



Panel fences tend to be a bit anonymous, if it were a featheredge fence it should have the posts and rails on the owners side.[/quote]

What do wall plates look like/made of? Can you see if one has been fitted?[/quote]



https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=timbe ... vAFN2GM%3A[/quote]

Are these always made of wood? Just out of interest - what would actually happen by attaching concrete posts directly to a brick house?
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Re: Fencing question

Postby despair » Wed Jul 13, 2016 9:39 pm

Your link to a photo of a 4inch by 2 inch length of timber attached to the house is the correct way to attach
since it should start from above damp course level

as for which way up panel fences are normally the side where the slats overlap downwards would be the "good side " which often faces the neighbour but theres no rule about it
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