Sticky Paint to Protect Fence

Sticky Paint to Protect Fence

Postby bernadette » Wed Mar 09, 2005 4:28 pm

We have recently rebuilt our fence, which is a boundary to a public footpath. We have had trouble with teenagers spraying graffiti and trying to pull the fence down.

I have been advised that a sticky or greasy coating can be applied, which could deter them.

Any ideas where I could get hold of this?

Plus has anyone had any similar experiences; if so, do you have any other solutions?

thanks a lot
bernadette
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2005 4:24 pm

Ads are not endorsed by www.gardenlaw.co.uk or the staff thereof and visitors should perform their own due diligence on the product or service offered.
 

Re: Sticky Paint to Protect Fence

Postby David » Wed Mar 09, 2005 5:25 pm

bernadette wrote:We have recently rebuilt our fence, which is a boundary to a public footpath. We have had trouble with teenagers spraying graffiti and trying to pull the fence down.

I have been advised that a sticky or greasy coating can be applied, which could deter them.

Any ideas where I could get hold of this?

Plus has anyone had any similar experiences; if so, do you have any other solutions?

thanks a lot

anti vandal paint, councils use them on lamposts, fences ect.
David
http://www.nwepaints.co.uk/acatalog/Spe ... aints.html
David
 
Posts: 48
Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2005 7:52 pm

Postby Beech » Thu Mar 10, 2005 5:52 pm

I agree with countryman, as far as I know there have been cases where people have successfully claimed compensation for damages where anti-vandal paint has been used below 6ft height.

Best contact a good agricultural supplier who may have jsut hwat you need.
Beech
 
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2005 3:09 pm

Postby Cytania » Tue Mar 15, 2005 2:55 pm

This may sound a bit weak but growing a climber over your fence would make graffitti pretty pointless. Why spray paint if ivy renders it illegible?

The only way to prevent attack on your fence is to strengthen it beyond the usual lap construction; ideally a wall. You might want to use reclaimed bricks as a rough and ready face is also graffitti unfriendly.

On second thoughts how about starting a hedge behind your fence. Think blackthorn or berberis (check Gardener's World magazine for bulk hedging suppliers, they can be very cheap 'bare root'). Prepare your soil so it gets a good start and lightly trim it for growth. Hopefully it'll establish by next year and then you can remove the remains of your fence to reveal far more thorny proposition (you could still put chainlink or plain wire across the old fence posts).
They cut down all the trees, put 'em in a tree museum and charged all the people just to see 'em
Cytania
 
Posts: 156
Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2005 1:17 pm
Location: East Midlands


Return to Fences

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron