Hedge Removal

Hedge Removal

Postby JackC » Thu Sep 23, 2010 2:15 pm

Hi there,

I have just moved into a new house and want to remove the hedge at the front of the property to allow for a driveway/car parking.

I was just wondering if there are any laws preventing me from doing this? It is definatly my hedge and i've checked it for wildlife and found nothing. I've had a little search and belive i am within my right to remove it but I just wanted to check i wasnt missing anything.

Thanks in advance.
JackC
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2010 2:09 pm

Ads are not endorsed by www.gardenlaw.co.uk or the staff thereof and visitors should perform their own due diligence on the product or service offered.
 

Postby despair » Thu Sep 23, 2010 3:38 pm

if its a new house there should already be adequate parking versus no of bedrooms as per planning law

the planners may have stipulated a certain amount of front garden space

any driveway surface now has to conform to new rules and sometimes you even have to get planning for them
despair
 
Posts: 16041
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2005 8:07 am

Postby JackC » Thu Sep 23, 2010 3:50 pm

Sorry when I say new I mean new to me, the house itself is old and comes of a lane so dont need to have a kerb put in. I was also going to gravel it as opposed to paving which im told does not require planning due to the drainage or soemthing.
JackC
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2010 2:09 pm

Postby despair » Thu Sep 23, 2010 6:30 pm

In which case i suspect theres no problem

The only problem was you saying NEW house
despair
 
Posts: 16041
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2005 8:07 am

Postby Treeman » Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:08 pm

despair wrote:The only problem was you saying NEW house



Or you making assumptions
Treeman
 
Posts: 3993
Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2005 8:02 am

Postby TO » Fri Sep 24, 2010 6:53 pm

Hi

JackC says
I have just moved into a new house and want to remove the hedge at the front of the property

I wonder why if you didn't like the hedge did you buy the house?

JackC asks
I was just wondering if there are any laws preventing me from doing this

I say probably not, other than the wildlife acts, but check such things as deeds for covenants and the planning permission if applicable for conditions relating to the retention of the hedge.

JackC says
I just wanted to check i wasnt missing anything

I say YES YOU ARE, Green Infrastructure, Climate Change Mitigation, Loss of Property Value, Reduction in Re-saleability, Sustainability, Health and Well Being Benefits, Noise Attenuation, Reduction in Particulate Pollution, possible destruction of a Biodiversity Action Plan Priority Habitat to mention but a few.

TO
TO
 
Posts: 639
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 2:05 pm

Postby Midori » Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:13 pm

Can I just ask, Do you own it, or are you renting?

If you own it I cannot see any reason you cannot, but if you rent, you woulr need the owner's permission.

Cheers, midori
User avatar
Midori
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 1:41 am
Location: Hampshire

Postby Emulated » Sat Sep 25, 2010 8:29 pm

Is the lane maintained by the council? If so they may object to gravel within 2 metres of the lane. They require a means of preventing the gravel getting onto the highway.

JackC wrote:Sorry when I say new I mean new to me, the house itself is old and comes of a lane so dont need to have a kerb put in. I was also going to gravel it as opposed to paving which im told does not require planning due to the drainage or soemthing.
Emulated
 
Posts: 596
Joined: Sun Jul 02, 2006 11:13 am
Location: Exeter

Postby w3526602 » Fri Oct 01, 2010 7:44 am

Hi,

Isn't there some fairly recent (20 years?) law about not removing ancient hedgegrows on a village boundary? If there is, hopefully it won't apply here.

You say "hedge", which could apply to a row of mature trees. But even if yours is a privet, why not ask your council Arborial Officer?

602
602 (That was my "last three")
w3526602
 
Posts: 446
Joined: Mon Sep 20, 2010 4:58 pm
Location: south wales

Postby catapult1 » Mon Oct 04, 2010 4:59 pm

You would also have to get a dropped curb..
My answers are not of a legal nature, only what I consider to be common sense.
catapult1
 
Posts: 786
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:51 am
Location: Hampshire

Postby TO » Mon Oct 04, 2010 6:55 pm

Hi

w3526602 asks
Isn't there some fairly recent (20 years?) law about not removing ancient hedgegrows on a village boundary

I think you are alluding to The Hedgerow Regulations 1997

w3526602 says
hopefully it won't apply here

So you are happy at the destruction of national biodiversity action plan priority habitats. Habitats that could be hundreds of years old, of historic, landscape, wildlife and archaeological importance that are integral to the character of our countryside and landscape and have legal protection.

Hedgerows that form or are within the curtilage of a dwelling house are outside the scope of the Regulations no matter what, one of the biggest downfalls of the Regulations.

w3526602 says
"hedge", which could apply to a row of mature trees

A hedge is a hedge and row of trees is a row of trees. Two completely different things.

w3526602 says
why not ask your council Arborial Officer?

Good idea, the Highways and the planners too

TO
TO
 
Posts: 639
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 2:05 pm

Postby w3526602 » Tue Oct 05, 2010 7:15 am

So you are happy at the destruction of national biodiversity action plan priority habitats. Habitats that could be hundreds of years old, of historic, landscape, wildlife and archaeological importance that are integral to the character of our countryside and landscape and have legal protection.

Hi TO,

In this case I have no data on which to form an opinion, but I did say that I hoped that the legal restrictions did not apply here. Yes I am concerned about the things you mention, but not to the detriment of my own species. It could be argued that archaeological importance is only important to someone who is interested in Archaeology.

I "done a Google" for HEDGE DEFINITION, came up with http://www.thefreedictionary.com/hedge which defines a hedge as a row of shrubs or low growing trees

602
602 (That was my "last three")
w3526602
 
Posts: 446
Joined: Mon Sep 20, 2010 4:58 pm
Location: south wales

Postby TO » Tue Oct 05, 2010 7:32 am

Hi

w3526602 says
Yes I am concerned about the things you mention, but not to the detriment of my own species

So you think the destruction of your environment is not to your detriment, and your history has nothing to teach you.

Google is not the font of all knowledge despite the belief on this site to the contrary. For the purposes of the 1997 Regulations rows of trees don't constitute hedges.

TO
TO
 
Posts: 639
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 2:05 pm

Postby w3526602 » Tue Oct 05, 2010 7:53 am

Hi TO

So you think the destruction of your environment is not to your detriment, and your history has nothing to teach you.

Did I say that?

Google is not the font of all knowledge despite the belief on this site to the contrary. For the purposes of the 1997 Regulations rows of trees don't constitute hedges.

Google is a search engine. It enables you to find sources of information, ie - a dictionary definition of of a word.

The 1997 Regulations are not a dictionary.

If the hedge in question consists of trees (dictionary definition) then the 1997 regulations should be consulted.

I suspect that you are attacking me (and others) because we do not share your views. I'm happy to go along with that, but I'm not sure that the site owner feels the same. ????

602
602 (That was my "last three")
w3526602
 
Posts: 446
Joined: Mon Sep 20, 2010 4:58 pm
Location: south wales

Postby TO » Tue Oct 05, 2010 1:34 pm

Hi

w3526602 says
Hi TO
So you think the destruction of your environment is not to your detriment, and your history has nothing to teach you.
Did I say that?

No I said that you said .
Yes I am concerned about the things you mention, but not to the detriment of my own species. It could be argued that archaeological importance is only important to someone who is interested in Archaeology.


w3526602 says
Google is a search engine. It enables you to find sources of information, ie - a dictionary definition of of a word.

But applying it correctly is a different matter, as much of the returned information is totally irrelevant, such as the definition of a hedge as a row of trees when applied in relation to the 1997 Hedgerow Regulations.

w3526602 says
The 1997 Regulations are not a dictionary
. Quite right. It's the law, and the law you were alluding to.
and
If the hedge in question consists of trees (dictionary definition) then the 1997 regulations should be consulted.
. For the purposes of the Regulations a row of trees does not constitute a hedge, no matter what you or Googgle, or wickidickie think so why consult the Regulations, they won't apply. The reason being The Hedgerow Regulations are to protect hedgerows, there are other ways to protect trees ie TPO's

w3526602 says
I suspect that you are attacking me (and others) because we do not share your views. I'm happy to go along with that, but I'm not sure that the site owner feels the same. ????

I'm not attacking anyone unless you consider putting right factual errors, and opinion put forward as law as an attack. As for the pathetic attempt at bullying please tell me, what do the owners of the site feel. Get it of your chest and out in the open and not as a private mail please.

TO
TO
 
Posts: 639
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 2:05 pm

Ads are not endorsed by www.gardenlaw.co.uk or the staff thereof and visitors should perform their own due diligence on the product or service offered.
 
Next

Return to Hedges

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest