A hypothetical hedge question

A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Tue Aug 23, 2011 5:08 pm

Image

Image

If you bordered a hedge like this, which overhung your garden by several feet, would you cut it back knowing that you would see the effect in the second photo?

And would you see a reduction in height as much consolation?
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby Mattylad » Tue Aug 23, 2011 6:14 pm

That all depends upon how large my garden is, if they are in the way of a nice view should they be cut down and if I need to use the space that they are taking up on my side of the boundary.

If I need to put a shed there then I would agree that a trim is in need and wont care what it looks like because the shed would be in the way, but if its something I'm looking at out of the lounge window then they may be nicer to look at than say - an estate on the other side etc.

So its not a simple case of yes or no - many other factors come into it.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby appledore » Tue Aug 23, 2011 6:40 pm

Hi Will. It's not a hypothetical hedge. It's leylandii. :lol:

Seriously though I agree with Mattylad a lot depends on the size of your garden and what it's hiding. The trouble is when they're left to get to that size whatever you do to them makes them look a mess. If you trim the sides you're left with brown wood, and if you persuaded your neighbour to reduce the height they'd be a funny shape.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby Mojisola » Tue Aug 23, 2011 7:06 pm

If the hedge was taking a lot of space from the garden, I probably would cut it back but then find an attractive climber to hide some of the bare branches.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Tue Aug 23, 2011 7:40 pm

Mojisola wrote:If the hedge was taking a lot of space from the garden, I probably would cut it back but then find an attractive climber to hide some of the bare branches.


This is good, a positive solution. So a Leylandii hedge doesn't have to be seen in such a negative light. :) There are almost always ways to turn a negative in to a positive.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby despair » Tue Aug 23, 2011 9:21 pm

Mojisila

Do let us know when you find a climber that will actually grow to even climb up such trees

IMHE The ground around the base of conifers especially that size will be totally barren and unlikely to support any growth of even grass let alone a climber
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby arborlad » Tue Aug 23, 2011 10:12 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:Image

If you bordered a hedge like this, which overhung your garden by several feet, would you cut it back knowing that you would see the effect in the second photo?

And would you see a reduction in height as much consolation?


It wouldn't be difficult to improve this tree with a pair of Felcos and a bit of patience, just cut off everything dead or damaged from the trunk and along the branches, if you think it will be a tedious job, you're right, but well worth it.

Any number of climbers will have no trouble at all, Ivy certainly, don't be tempted with Russian Vine - it works, but too well! The soil wont be depleted like it would be if it were a privet hedge, just add a bit of compost and bonemeal to the planting hole.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Wed Aug 24, 2011 11:05 am

arborlad wrote:It wouldn't be difficult to improve this tree with a pair of Felcos and a bit of patience, just cut off everything dead or damaged from the trunk and along the branches, if you think it will be a tedious job, you're right, but well worth it.

Any number of climbers will have no trouble at all, Ivy certainly, don't be tempted with Russian Vine - it works, but too well! The soil wont be depleted like it would be if it were a privet hedge, just add a bit of compost and bonemeal to the planting hole.


I have seen that ivy will grow up most things, including trees. But you could get in to trouble for allowing ivy to grow up someone else’s trees.

What would happen after you cut everything back to the trunk?

In the worst case scenario, what would happen if the tree didn't overhang enough for you to cut right back, only to bare stems? Still all hypothetical questions.

Thank you.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby Mojisola » Wed Aug 24, 2011 12:45 pm

I would improve the soil before planting - that would be normal anyway when putting in new plants. I'd probably plant an ivy for the future and a small flowered clematis for more immediate covering. I have a beautiful scented one which is a delight in the Spring.

If someone who owned a leylandii hedge like that complained about an ivy growing up, I couldn't take them seriously!
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Wed Aug 24, 2011 2:34 pm

Mojisola wrote:If someone who owned a leylandii hedge like that complained about an ivy growing up, I couldn't take them seriously!


Neither could I. The trouble is the ivy and anything else could be cut off from the tree owner’s side if it were growing up their trees. I wonder what else could be planted to give cover, but not actually need the trees for support.

I like the idea of privacy screens with tall poles, that would be a space saving solution, or even your own hedge if room.

I think some of the problems with these hedges overhanging small gardens is that people don't know how to mask the ugly bare stems or don't have much room to plant things of their own. But there is always a solution, I think, even if it is planters and shrubs, bamboo or climbing plants.

Those who are on the other side of a hedge, the less sunny and attractive side, have to look for solutions, rather than let the hedge and neighbour the other side spoil the enjoyment of their own garden.

If a monster hedge like the one pictured above was reduced to 12 or 13 feet, then cut back to reveal bare stems, the neighbour has to then be creative and find ways to live with what is there.

As so many people come to this forum and indeed other forums in need of help and advice on these hedges and being the other side of them, it is important to show people there are ways to get around the negatives.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby appledore » Wed Aug 24, 2011 7:05 pm

We have all sorts growing beside our leylandii hedges. We just put some compost in the hole when we're planting and that's it. Our son has ivy growing up his leylandii. It grows with no encouragement.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Wed Aug 24, 2011 8:29 pm

appledore wrote:We have all sorts growing beside our leylandii hedges. We just put some compost in the hole when we're planting and that's it. Our son has ivy growing up his leylandii. It grows with no encouragement.


I think ivy could grow up anything. We have several ivy plants and I sometimes wonder if I stood still for too long, it would grow round me. I have to watch it from the corner of one eye if reading in our garden. :wink:

My nan and granddad had a Leylandii hedge and it didn't stop anything else growing beside it, I'm not sure why people think the ground around them is unsuitable for growing other plants.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby despair » Thu Aug 25, 2011 12:11 am

As i have said before it all depends on your soil and the area you live and the rainfall
If you have dry sandy soil you can pile in compost till your blue in the face but the whole area around leylandi will be dry and barren i have spent more than enough years battling with the problem and i am no novice gardener by any means
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Thu Aug 25, 2011 4:52 pm

despair wrote:As i have said before it all depends on your soil and the area you live and the rainfall
If you have dry sandy soil you can pile in compost till your blue in the face but the whole area around leylandi will be dry and barren i have spent more than enough years battling with the problem and i am no novice gardener by any means


Is it the roots of the Leylandii taking moisture out the ground? http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/62 ... hedge.html

I thought it was funny that some readers want to remain anonymous when talking about their hedges, it is almost like people are afraid of what others will think because of the stigma attached to Leylandii. I don't think I would ever plant it unless there were no neighbours the other side.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby appledore » Thu Aug 25, 2011 6:45 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:. I don't think I would ever plant it unless there were no neighbours the other side.


It depends on the neighbours. You either block them out with leylandii, or strangle them with ivy.
The choice is yours. :lol:
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