A hypothetical hedge question

Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby despair » Thu Aug 25, 2011 7:10 pm

Some people grow Leylandi and then allow ivy to romp up and strangle the trees too
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Thu Aug 25, 2011 7:36 pm

appledore wrote:It depends on the neighbours. You either block them out with leylandii, or strangle them with ivy.
The choice is yours. :lol:


I choose a Will friendly ivy and giant redwoods. :lol: :lol: Never knew ivy was so scary, must plant bigger trees.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby Roblewis » Thu Aug 25, 2011 9:24 pm

These pictures show the real problem of leylandii - they cannot reshoot from brown wood when cut back. If you do not keep them in regular trim this is always the result. Personally Clematis Montana is the only real competitor in terms of growth for such trees.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Thu Aug 25, 2011 11:26 pm

It is such a shame people let them grow out of control, they make lovely hedges in the right hands. They don't just look awful cut back to bare stems, they also look silly when they have been lopped and they are leggy at the bottom and have a small amount of square shaped green at the top. They stop providing privacy when they get too tall anyway, so it defeats the object of having them for that reason.

Whilst on holiday in Wales we saw that most Leylandii hedges had been destroyed by aphids, they were all brown. It was awful to see as the hedges were so beautifully care for and trimmed nicely. :(
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby despair » Thu Aug 25, 2011 11:31 pm

Leylandi like many conifers actually die from the ground up anyway which is why you get that leggy look

Conifer aphid is not the only thing affecting them ........the last couple of harsh winters on top of long periods of drought conditions have done for many trees
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Thu Aug 25, 2011 11:39 pm

despair wrote:Leylandi like many conifers actually die from the ground up anyway which is why you get that leggy look

Conifer aphid is not the only thing affecting them ........the last couple of harsh winters on top of long periods of drought conditions have done for many trees


Maybe last winter is what finished a lot of these trees off then. We saw all these hedges in lovely gardens and parks, all dead, well looking dead. I don't suppose it is easy to just rip them out and replace. Oh they did look awful! I felt sorry for those who had nice front hedges to properties, which had been kept so perfect, just to go all brown. I don't like aphids, I'm getting some lady bird nests nest year. :)
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby appledore » Fri Aug 26, 2011 6:32 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:It is such a shame people let them grow out of control, they make lovely hedges in the right hands. They don't just look awful cut back to bare stems, they also look silly when they have been lopped and they are leggy at the bottom and have a small amount of square shaped green at the top. They stop providing privacy when they get too tall anyway, so it defeats the object of having them for that reason.

Whilst on holiday in Wales we saw that most Leylandii hedges had been destroyed by aphids, they were all brown. It was awful to see as the hedges were so beautifully care for and trimmed nicely. :(


I agree Will leylandii do makes lovely hedges when they're looked after properly. Ours are trimmed every year and they make a lovely backdrop to other plants and shrubs as well as providing privacy. They do look silly when they're all trunk with a tufty bit on the top. Our neighbours have specimen conifers. They were lovely trees until they starting hacking them to bits. They've ended up looking like eggcups.

We've had some brown patches on the hedges this year, probably from last winter, but they're improving now.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:09 pm

appledore wrote:I agree Will leylandii do makes lovely hedges when they're looked after properly. Ours are trimmed every year and they make a lovely backdrop to other plants and shrubs as well as providing privacy. They do look silly when they're all trunk with a tufty bit on the top. Our neighbours have specimen conifers. They were lovely trees until they starting hacking them to bits. They've ended up looking like eggcups.

We've had some brown patches on the hedges this year, probably from last winter, but they're improving now.


Hi apples. I'm glad to hear your conifers are improving, they can recover from frost sometimes. Our conifers grew too tall and now we can't cut them back without seeing a little brown, but they are ok. I wouldn't mind having a Leylandii hedge, not here, but if we had the right plot. I would look after it like you do, they are lovely when they are trimmed every year.

Does your neighbour sit in his egg cup and scream.. "I'M A DODO!" :?: :lol: :lol:
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby appledore » Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:19 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:[Does your neighbour sit in his egg cup and scream.. "I'M A DODO!" :?: :lol: :lol:


Yes, when he's not prancing around like the great I am looking like a wally. :lol:
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby arborlad » Sat Aug 27, 2011 4:25 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:
arborlad wrote:It wouldn't be difficult to improve this tree with a pair of Felcos and a bit of patience, just cut off everything dead or damaged from the trunk and along the branches, if you think it will be a tedious job, you're right, but well worth it.

Any number of climbers will have no trouble at all, Ivy certainly, don't be tempted with Russian Vine - it works, but too well! The soil wont be depleted like it would be if it were a privet hedge, just add a bit of compost and bonemeal to the planting hole.


I have seen that ivy will grow up most things, including trees. But you could get in to trouble for allowing ivy to grow up someone else’s trees.



Preventing something from becoming rampant and causing a nuisance is likely to be more of a problem than establishing it in the first place.

What would happen after you cut everything back to the trunk?


Firstly, I think it would improve the general appearance, it's all the dead twigs etc. that detract from it, it would also allow more light and air into the centre of the tree and encourage new growth to come from the other side of the tree.

In the worst case scenario, what would happen if the tree didn't overhang enough for you to cut right back, only to bare stems? Still all hypothetical questions.


There you have a conflict of interests, yours only extend as far as the limit of your land, and good arboricultural practice, which says cutting back to the trunk would not only look better, but is better for the tree. In these sort of circumstances I've usually spent 5-10 mins with the secatuers and then let all parties see the result - the outcome is always unanimously in favour of doing it correctly.

Is it the roots of the Leylandii taking moisture out the ground?


Yes of course it is, along with nutrients, but at no greater rate than any other green thing of a similar size and age, if you had a privet hedge of an equivalent size then you would be having problems trying to establish something there.

I would have a look around your own garden, and neighbours, at whatever climbers you already have and go from there.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby arborlad » Sat Aug 27, 2011 4:37 pm

despair wrote:Some people grow Leylandi and then allow ivy to romp up and strangle the trees too


despair wrote:Mojisila

Do let us know when you find a climber that will actually grow to even climb up such trees

IMHE The ground around the base of conifers especially that size will be totally barren and unlikely to support any growth of even grass let alone a climber


:? :?



despair wrote: i am no novice gardener by any means


Eradicated your bellbine yet?
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Sat Aug 27, 2011 7:23 pm

arborlad wrote:
In the worst case scenario, what would happen if the tree didn't overhang enough for you to cut right back, only to bare stems? Still all hypothetical questions.


There you have a conflict of interests, yours only extend as far as the limit of your land, and good arboricultural practice, which says cutting back to the trunk would not only look better, but is better for the tree. In these sort of circumstances I've usually spent 5-10 mins with the secatuers and then let all parties see the result - the outcome is always unanimously in favour of doing it correctly.

It would be better if all tree owners were interested in what is best for their trees.

Is it the roots of the Leylandii taking moisture out the ground?


Yes of course it is, along with nutrients, but at no greater rate than any other green thing of a similar size and age, if you had a privet hedge of an equivalent size then you would be having problems trying to establish something there.


That is what I first thought. But I have read so many posts saying that nothing successfully grows beside Leylandii. Not just despair, but many other people on other forums too. It might be a myth or some people are unlucky enough to have the wrong conditions in their garden for both Leylandii and other plants beside them? I don't have them so can't speak from experience. apples has Leylandii and successfully grows things beside her hedge, so it must depend on the conditions in each garden.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby despair » Sat Aug 27, 2011 7:58 pm

Will

You are correct in many soils Leylandi cause utter desecratation of the soil and nothing will grow
I can only guess that in certain soils with a high rainfall norm theres no problem but i do know that in light sandy soils and the kind od drought conditions experienced in my part of the country all conifers not just leylandi cause the whole area around them to be so dry that nothing inc grass will grow

In years past there was not the problem but today even Tree surgeons are saying that drought conditions are severely affecting many different trees
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:09 pm

despair wrote:Will

You are correct in many soils Leylandi cause utter desecratation of the soil and nothing will grow
I can only guess that in certain soils with a high rainfall norm theres no problem but i do know that in light sandy soils and the kind od drought conditions experienced in my part of the country all conifers not just leylandi cause the whole area around them to be so dry that nothing inc grass will grow

In years past there was not the problem but today even Tree surgeons are saying that drought conditions are severely affecting many different trees

My parents had a very large Leylandii hedge, many years ago. They had to have it topped because a neighbour complained they were losing sunlight to their garden. Nothing was planted near or under this hedge, but grass did grow ok up to it. So it must be different conditions.

I hoped that there would be an answer to all the problems regarding these hedges. I know people are battling with neighbours every day, all across the country. I hoped that we could come up with as many ways to pretty up a bare hedge, find plants to grow near them etc…

Let’s keep trying though, it would be great if people come to the forum and find ideas to help them cope with being the other side of the hedge and turn it in to a positive. The HHL doesn’t help everyone, hedges are often not reduced to 2m, like some think they will be. But the appearance from the other side of the fence can be improved, I think.
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Re: A hypothetical hedge question

Postby arborlad » Sat Aug 27, 2011 9:46 pm

WILL*REMAIN*STRONG wrote:
arborlad wrote:
Is it the roots of the Leylandii taking moisture out the ground?


Yes of course it is, along with nutrients, but at no greater rate than any other green thing of a similar size and age, if you had a privet hedge of an equivalent size then you would be having problems trying to establish something there.


That is what I first thought. .


Then hang on to that thought because it is correct.
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