New builds and Mature Leylandii

New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby BlueFlyer » Mon Oct 10, 2011 2:37 pm

Hi,

I think I know the answer to this already and its Caveat Emptor but thought I might ask the community for your views. A new build house I'm intrested in purchasing backs on to some exsisting properties. These properties have approx a 20 meter high leylandii hedge running at the back of the boundry, I'm told the trees also have a TPO.

The developer has said they will cut back the branches to the boundry, I assume cutting the roots back would be a no because of the TPO and also it would kill the tree/make it unsafe.

Would these trees be an issue to foundations of the plot (typical small sized new build garden so 15 meters long), would you need to apply for permission to manage the boundry each year? Would the high hedge law be applicable?
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby despair » Mon Oct 10, 2011 4:50 pm

Cutting those trees back to boundary may result in bare brown stems

if you do not want the shadow etc those trees create .........walk away
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Mon Oct 10, 2011 5:02 pm

Roots being an issue for the foundations of a new build is highly unlikely. Most subsidence related issues are due to the type of soil, being clay.

As despair has already said, if the shade is an issue walk away. Cutting back might need to be done in the future and with a TPO that ‘might’ prove difficult. So whatever these trees look like now, you can bet they will be towering at a greater height in the future.

You need to think carefully about the future impact of these trees. Shade and aesthetic appeal. We all view trees in a different way, for some these trees would be a godsend, for others, a nightmare.

If they have a TPO, speak to the council directly and ask what should be done if you want to cut back in the future etc…
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby BlueFlyer » Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:30 pm

Thanks guys that's the same Understanding I have, I don't mind trees and like the wildlife they attract, but this looks like a mini wood in a small garden so defiantly would need some management. I guess this is why the developers are offering a good deal on the plot.
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:37 pm

If the plot is very small and is towered over by neighbouring trees, you might not be able to sell it in the future. Well, you could sell it, but you might make a substantial loss. It can be difficult to find a buyer who will accept being overshadowed, never mind the potential problems with roots and branches.
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby TO » Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:39 pm

Hi

You are bang on in your view of Caveat Emptor, and it is for you to decide if you want a hedge on your boundary over which you have no control. The hedge owning neighbours are unlikely to be sympathetic as they are unlikely to want a view of the new development, and may like to keep their screen.

TPO's protect trees not hedges, so check with the Council what, if anything, is protected. If a TPO is in force then the developer cannot cut the trees without consent, and that is not a given.

The high hedge law does not apply to trees, it applies to high hedges. Even if it is a hedge to which the high hedge law applies, it does not follow that you can dictate to the new neighbour the height that their hedge should be.

Think long and hard about what it is you want. Caveat Emptor

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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby Sudynim » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:59 pm

BlueFlyer wrote:These properties have approx a 20 meter high leylandii hedge running at the back of the boundry, I'm told the trees also have a TPO


I'm puzzled to imagine how a 20m high leylandii hedge could be considered deserving of a protection order. Sounds fishy to me.
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby Roblewis » Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:38 am

Sounds like a developers excuse to do nothing I suspect he was expected to pay felling or other costs. One day some mug will by into the plot. At 20m these trees have a long way to go before full height which is 40m plus according to some experts.
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby BlueFlyer » Thu Oct 13, 2011 3:08 pm

Well we turned up to go out on to the plot, and the developer had sold it that morning, nice of them to phone and tell us!

I was a bit dubious about the TPO as well and could only figure, that the owner has applied for it to make sure they will not see the new development (The trees are are at the bottom of their yard), or the council have slapped one on to create a wildlife corridor that runs the length of the development as a conition of the new development.
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby despair » Fri Oct 14, 2011 3:54 pm

well just think you have had a lucky escape !!!
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Re: New builds and Mature Leylandii

Postby WILL*REMAIN*STRONG » Fri Oct 14, 2011 4:48 pm

BlueFlyer wrote:Well we turned up to go out on to the plot, and the developer had sold it that morning, nice of them to phone and tell us!

I was a bit dubious about the TPO as well and could only figure, that the owner has applied for it to make sure they will not see the new development (The trees are are at the bottom of their yard), or the council have slapped one on to create a wildlife corridor that runs the length of the development as a conition of the new development.


The wildlife corridor sounds nice and all, but unless the trees are to be forever maintained 'kept to a certain height' they will become a tower of shade. You might have had a lucky escape.
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