Are HIPs Dead?

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Postby despair » Fri Jul 16, 2010 8:35 am

Strangely in my Town the very best most highly rated solicitors occupy the best spot in town however they have been there since the Great Great Grandfather started the business all those years ago
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HIPS

Postby DavidM » Mon Jul 26, 2010 5:42 pm

& to think I was toying with the idea of training to become a HIP & energy guy a while ago..... thankfully I was put off as it caused so much controversy at the time, I thought give it a few years & they might stop doing them!

Bingo, I was right!

Energy surveyors are still going though.

However, I'll post another story about that somewhere else!
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despair

Postby DavidM » Mon Jul 26, 2010 6:25 pm

Last edited by DavidM on Thu Jul 29, 2010 11:16 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby ukmicky » Mon Jul 26, 2010 6:51 pm

I just had to pay out an extra £200 for searches for the house im buying that were originally part of the Hip .

I am therefore not happy they stopped them.

My friend who paid out all his redundancy money on the training is also not happy
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Postby petal » Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:26 pm

I have to agree with SYLVA, the biggest single delay with the conveyancing process is solicitors.

I have bought and sold a few properties over the years, and on one, I successfully did the conveyancing for both the sale and the purchase myself. The only delay I ever encountered in the whole process was my purchasers solicitor. Things got so slow with him that I ended up personally going round to his office to sort things out.

On the last property I sold (a flat) my estate agent kept ringing me up asking me to nudge my solicitor into action. The estate agent knew more of what was going on than my solicitor.

So, until we can get solicitors to work at a realistic speed, then we will never be able to get the conveyancing process to move along better.

It would seem that there are those that share my concerns

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/pictu ... ml?image=3
Last edited by petal on Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby easily.confused » Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:36 pm

GPS (now known as DavidM)

May I suggest theat Despair is refering to the fact that you are using your auto signature to advertise your business.

I'm not really sure how this sits with the ethics of the forum.
Last edited by easily.confused on Fri Jul 30, 2010 7:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Conveyancer » Fri Jul 30, 2010 6:48 pm

petal wrote:I have to agree with SYLVA, the biggest single delay with the conveyancing process is solicitors.


Delay arises for any one or more of the following reasons:

1. Lawyers not getting on with the job. I readily concede that delay is often down to the conveyancers. That is partly because firms take on more work than they can cope with expeditiously and partly because of the conveyancing system. If a conveyancer is not getting on with your job it is because he is dealing with someone else's!

2. The way property purchases are financed. You cannot make a mortgage application until you have chosen a property. That part of the system could be speeded up considerably by lenders providing borrowers with certificates that that they are prepared to lend up to a certain amount.

3. Dithering. In many jurisdictions once you have said you are going to buy you sign up - "sold subject to contract" is an unknown concept. Vendors do not put their property on the market unless they are ready to sell them. Once the parties are committed the transaction goes to a notary who draws up the transfer papers. Non-notary lawyers may be involved. Obviously there are safeguards.

4. The dreaded chain. In most (?all other) countries people do not buy and sell simultaneously. They either buy and pay two mortgages if they can afford it, or sell and go into temporary accommodation until they find another property.

5. The conveyancing system. Under the English system lawyers are required to look into far more things than lawyers elsewhere whose main job is simply to ensure that the buyer gets a good title.
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Postby petal » Fri Jul 30, 2010 8:15 pm

Conveyancer wrote:petal wrote:
I have to agree with SYLVA, the biggest single delay with the conveyancing process is solicitors.


Why single out Petal he just agreed with the statement made by SYLVA, and neither was saying that Solicitors were the only delay, just in their opinion, the biggest delay.

Conveyancer wrote:1. Lawyers not getting on with the job. I readily concede that delay is often down to the conveyancers. That is partly because firms take on more work than they can cope with expeditiously and partly because of the conveyancing system. If a conveyancer is not getting on with your job it is because he is dealing with someone else's!


Not the customers (clients) problem, they are paying for a service and so should get it. You wouldn’t put up with it if it was your car in the local garage. So long as people don’t complain or make excuses for them, they will never get better.

Conveyancer wrote:2. The way property purchases are financed. You cannot make a mortgage application until you have chosen a property. That part of the system could be speeded up considerably by lenders providing borrowers with certificates that that they are prepared to lend up to a certain amount.


Not completely true, our son bought a flat recently; he was given a provisional offer by his bank subject to a satisfactory survey on the property he finally chose. Can’t do much quicker/better than that. Not really part of the conveyancing process, but part of the buying process. Despite that his solicitor still managed to cause delays, and he couldn’t move in on the agreed date.

Conveyancer wrote:4. The dreaded chain. In most (?all other) countries people do not buy and sell simultaneously. They either buy and pay two mortgages if they can afford it, or sell and go into temporary accommodation until they find another property.


Buyers can do exactly the same in this country if they so choose. If they choose not to do so, then this cannot be used as an excuse for delay in the conveyancing process. Any buyer will be aware if there is a chain and how big, and has the freedom of choice whether to enter into it or not. Not really part of the conveyance process.

Conveyancer wrote:5. The conveyancing system. Under the English system lawyers are required to look into far more things than lawyers elsewhere whose main job is simply to ensure that the buyer gets a good title.


If the property is registered, solicitors do very little in the way of looking into things; most of it is done by using standard forms available from Oyez Stationers, and sending them off to the appropriate local authorities.
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Re: Are HIPs Dead?

Postby london » Sun Dec 05, 2010 5:20 pm

It was a bad idea from the start
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Re: Are HIPs Dead?

Postby dennat27 » Tue Jun 21, 2011 2:44 pm

yes thank god they are load of old beloney
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Re:

Postby Conveyancer » Sat Jun 25, 2011 7:36 pm

Nearly a year late, but to respond to petal's points:

petal wrote:
Conveyancer wrote:petal wrote:
I have to agree with SYLVA, the biggest single delay with the conveyancing process is solicitors.


Why single out Petal he just agreed with the statement made by SYLVA, and neither was saying that Solicitors were the only delay, just in their opinion, the biggest delay.

Not singling anyone out.

Conveyancer wrote:1. Lawyers not getting on with the job. I readily concede that delay is often down to the conveyancers. That is partly because firms take on more work than they can cope with expeditiously and partly because of the conveyancing system. If a conveyancer is not getting on with your job it is because he is dealing with someone else's!


Not the customers (clients) problem, they are paying for a service and so should get it. You wouldn’t put up with it if it was your car in the local garage. So long as people don’t complain or make excuses for them, they will never get better.

No argument with that.

Conveyancer wrote:2. The way property purchases are financed. You cannot make a mortgage application until you have chosen a property. That part of the system could be speeded up considerably by lenders providing borrowers with certificates that that they are prepared to lend up to a certain amount.


Not completely true, our son bought a flat recently; he was given a provisional offer by his bank subject to a satisfactory survey on the property he finally chose. Can’t do much quicker/better than that. Not really part of the conveyancing process, but part of the buying process. Despite that his solicitor still managed to cause delays, and he couldn’t move in on the agreed date.

Noted. Part of the original plan was that the report would include a surveyor's report, but the Council of Mortgage Lenders scuppered the idea by saying they would not accept sellers' surveys and still insist on their own.

Conveyancer wrote:4. The dreaded chain. In most (?all other) countries people do not buy and sell simultaneously. They either buy and pay two mortgages if they can afford it, or sell and go into temporary accommodation until they find another property.


Buyers can do exactly the same in this country if they so choose. If they choose not to do so, then this cannot be used as an excuse for delay in the conveyancing process. Any buyer will be aware if there is a chain and how big, and has the freedom of choice whether to enter into it or not. Not really part of the conveyance process.

Whilst it is true they can, on the whole they do not. Banks have always been fairly inflexible about anyone having more than one mortgage at a time.

Conveyancer wrote:5. The conveyancing system. Under the English system lawyers are required to look into far more things than lawyers elsewhere whose main job is simply to ensure that the buyer gets a good title.


If the property is registered, solicitors do very little in the way of looking into things; most of it is done by using standard forms available from Oyez Stationers, and sending them off to the appropriate local authorities.

That is just title. People look to conveyancers to cover everything.


london wrote:It was a bad idea from the start


dennat27 wrote:yes thank god they are load of old beloney


Up to a point I can only agree. However, people's memory does not go back far enough. Letters were being written to the newspapers saying things like: "When I was in the States I made an offer on Tuesday and moved in on Thursday. Why is the process taking weeks in England?" The papers decided, Labour being in power, that it was all the government's fault even though the system had been around for years. Labour promised to do something. Once they set out they were met not only with a failure to co-operate, but what was tantamount to outright hostility, from the professionals involved in buying and selling property. The government was told it was none of their business and the old mantra "Get government off our backs" was trotted out. That left the government in a tricky position as if they did nothing they would be accused of reneging on a promise. The result was what can only be described as half-baked. All it achieved was to ensure that a seller was "ready to roll" as soon as an offer was made. There was no guarantee that a buyer's conveyancer would look at the papers as soon as he received them. Equally importantly, all the other factors I mentioned above were not dealt with mainly because that would involve completely changing the way property is bought and sold.

Petal distinguishes between the buying process and the conveyancing process. The former is essentially cultural and I do not see an easy way for government to change it. The latter, whilst capable of improvement with modern technology, is basically sound and does not on its own militate against speed. Even so, as I have said elsewhere, the English conveyancing system is to a great extent a prisoner of its history and real reform cannot be achieved without root and branch changes to the law. Whilst that may be desirable, it does not bear contemplation.

As with any consumer matter, change comes from popular demand. If there are to be no radical changes in the law, rather than looking to government, consumers need to tackle the professionals involved and demand better service.
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Re: Are HIPs Dead?

Postby ukmicky » Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:15 pm

My limited experice of the conveyancing process is quite good , in fact amazing.

With my new house i got a mortgage ,all searches and the keys to the house 2 weeks after i first viewed.

I also exchange and completed on the same day.

It probably helped that the house was empty.

P.s By the why ,i liked the idea of HIP''s
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