Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby thin and crispy » Sun Jul 09, 2017 11:59 am

Does anyone happen to know of a fence treatment that will deter the growth of my neighbour's ivy which he likes to train up my fence? The ivy wouldn't bother me if it just stayed on his side, but it grows through the panels as well as between them and the concrete posts. The former is unsightly and, within a year, the latter just wedges the panels in so I can't slide them up for maintenance / re-treatment.

A friend suggested a mixture of turpentine and bitumen, but that sounds like it might be a bit messy and I don't really fancy a black fence. If only it were still possible to purchase creosote.

Incidentally, to save anyone the trouble of suggesting I ask my neighbour to desist, he won't: he says the ivy has 'a right to grow where it wants'. (Yes, he does view his plants as sentient beings; he's a follower of the Steinerist cult. :roll: )
Prejudice, not being founded on reason, cannot be removed by argument. Samuel Johnson.
User avatar
thin and crispy
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 8:57 pm

Ads are not endorsed by www.gardenlaw.co.uk or the staff thereof and visitors should perform their own due diligence on the product or service offered.
 

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby despair » Sun Jul 09, 2017 1:10 pm

Ivy lovers are a pain in the proverbial
If its your fence i would simply keep spraying every bit that comes through with glyphosate

When proper creosote was around that would have been the perfect fence treatment solution but its been discontinued
despair
 
Posts: 16043
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2005 8:07 am

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby mr sheen » Sun Jul 09, 2017 1:58 pm

You have the right to cut back any encroaching vegetation, right back to the boundary.
The neighbour doesn't have to prevent it growing onto your side.

If you kill it, the neighbour could claim for its replacement. No-one can second guess whether they will or not.
mr sheen
 
Posts: 2093
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2009 3:33 pm

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby Roblewis » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:07 pm

Creosote has not been discontinued it has actually been banned except for some very limited commercial uses. GLYOPHOSPATE is a very good systemic plant killer and will ultimately kill off even rampant ivy, mix with soap solution and paint onto the leaves.
Roblewis
 
Posts: 1764
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:41 pm

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby despair » Sun Jul 09, 2017 4:36 pm

the neighbour has no right whatever to grow ivy up your fence

so if you spray whatever comes through with glyphosate its tough
despair
 
Posts: 16043
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2005 8:07 am

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby arborlad » Sun Jul 09, 2017 6:38 pm

thin and crispy wrote:Does anyone happen to know of a fence treatment that will deter the growth of my neighbour's ivy which he likes to train up my fence?





I'm afraid you're searching for something that doesn't exist to the general public, what's available is marketed on the basis it is plant friendly :)

Creosote still exists, but again, not to the general public :(
arborlad

smile...it confuses people
arborlad
 
Posts: 7386
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 6:30 pm
Location: Hertfordshire

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby despair » Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:28 pm

so can creosote be obtained by fencers ?
despair
 
Posts: 16043
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2005 8:07 am

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby Roblewis » Sun Jul 09, 2017 10:40 pm

Despair

It is banned as a wood preservative for fences, also as winter tar oil wash - the two most important uses historically
Roblewis
 
Posts: 1764
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:41 pm

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby thin and crispy » Sun Jul 09, 2017 11:23 pm

Thank you all for your replies. I'm aware that I can cut off anything growing into my airspace and that (unfortunately) I am not entitled to kill the plant as it is rooted on the neighbour's land. In any case, glyphosate only seems to kill off the ivy leaves that it actually touches despite it being a systemic weedkiller. I was hoping for something that would stop the ivy binding onto the fabric of my fence. Looks like the black 'turpentine + bitumen' goo is the only solution then.

It seems that all the garden products which actually work have now been banned: creosote, armillatox, renadine, chlorate of soda etc. I know the reasons for this (they're political / societal as much as anything else), but it all feels a bit too unbalanced to me. Maybe if there was more money in creosote?
Prejudice, not being founded on reason, cannot be removed by argument. Samuel Johnson.
User avatar
thin and crispy
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 8:57 pm

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby Roblewis » Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:13 am

Thin and Crispy

It is the EU that led this ban along with our very own Control of Pesticides Regulations.
Roblewis
 
Posts: 1764
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:41 pm

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby arborlad » Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:46 am

thin and crispy wrote:Thank you all for your replies. I'm aware that I can cut off anything growing into my airspace and that (unfortunately) I am not entitled to kill the plant as it is rooted on the neighbour's land. In any case, glyphosate only seems to kill off the ivy leaves that it actually touches despite it being a systemic weedkiller. I was hoping for something that would stop the ivy binding onto the fabric of my fence. Looks like the black 'turpentine + bitumen' goo is the only solution then.

It seems that all the garden products which actually work have now been banned: creosote, armillatox, renadine, chlorate of soda etc. I know the reasons for this (they're political / societal as much as anything else), but it all feels a bit too unbalanced to me. Maybe if there was more money in creosote?





Not sure how much of the above is tongue-in-cheek, but the workplace of today, whether it's farm, factory, forest or building site etc., is immenseley safer than one in the 60s..........asbestos, DDT, chain saws with no anti-vibration, certain sheep dips, no fall protection, were all common hazards even if they weren't recognised as such. I certainly wouldn't want family and friends to be exposed to the sort of hazards I was exposed to - some of the effects I'm suffering from now!
arborlad

smile...it confuses people
arborlad
 
Posts: 7386
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 6:30 pm
Location: Hertfordshire

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby despair » Mon Jul 10, 2017 12:28 pm

Glyphosate if sprayed frequently onto encroaching ivy will work its way down the plant
despair
 
Posts: 16043
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2005 8:07 am

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby thin and crispy » Thu Jul 13, 2017 11:58 pm

Sorry to hear you're suffering the consequences of past hazards arborlad.

I agree with the point you made, but I don't think it's right to equate asbestosis, DDT toxicity, vibration white finger or falling from a great height with the more moderate dangers associated with the products I mentioned. Moreover, I wasn't really referring to health and safety in the workplace as much as private use on one's own land. In the latter case, the individual has much more control over how the product is used and the extent of their own exposure to it.

While I'd like to be able to use the products I mentioned in my own garden I wasn't advocating that the unwitting or the witless be exposed to the relatively minor hazards they present. I find it ironic that, in my time as an experimental physicist, the government trained me to handle a variety of toxic chemicals, corrosive/flammable liquids, cryogenic refrigerants and low-medium-level radioactive material. But outside work I'm not trusted to creosote my own shed.

It is also frowned upon for me to kill garden pests with armillatox, although it's quite alright by the EU for me to use vastly more of the same chemical for cleaning my patio before flushing it, via my drains, into the nearest watercourse :roll:.

More than that though, my post was having a dig at (a) the government's and EU's tendency to practice "good people-husbandry" for the sake of the economy, and (b) the abdication of personal responsibility which seems to have become so widespread amongst the public, a mentality which encourages the government to be even more restrictive for fear of being blamed when an idiot acts like an idiot.

I'm no idiot and I'd like to decide for myself what risks I take.

Unfortunately, government bans (or lack of them) are not dictated by considerations of safety alone. Behind my final sentence was an unstated comparison of the risks inherent in creosote use and in mobile phone use, neither of which, I believe, are entirely safe. The long-term risks from pulsed microwave radiation haven't yet been properly quantified, especially for juveniles, and there remains a distinct possibility that serious health consequences might show up in the population many decades after exposure. Despite these potential risks, no government has (as far as I am aware) placed significant restrictions upon the sale or use of mobile phones; or upon the siting of masts etc., or indeed upon the use of now ubiquitous WiFi systems which continuously spew out similar radiation. (Indeed governments seem intent on flooding our homes with even higher levels of microwave radiation from smart electricity meters etc.) It's a balance between risk to the individual and economic benefit to the country; and clearly governments have prejudged where they want to place the fulcrum.

Is it that they just haven't learned from past mistakes (i.e. being overly influenced by the tobacco lobby, and their tardiness over some of the other hazards you listed)? Or could it be that there's just too much money in smartphones and the related industries? Maybe if there was more money in creosote, we'd all still be happily slapping it on the larch lap (and unprotected skin) come the next bank holiday.
Prejudice, not being founded on reason, cannot be removed by argument. Samuel Johnson.
User avatar
thin and crispy
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 8:57 pm

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby thin and crispy » Fri Jul 14, 2017 12:07 am

despair wrote:Glyphosate if sprayed frequently onto encroaching ivy will work its way down the plant

I appreciate your suggestion despair, but unfortunately the first application kills all of the foliage that protrudes through the fence, so there's none left to receive subsequent applications, unless I directly spray into my neighbour's garden. In any case it would not be strictly legal to kill a plant rooted in my neighbour's land. I was just hoping for something that would deter it from binding to my fence.
Prejudice, not being founded on reason, cannot be removed by argument. Samuel Johnson.
User avatar
thin and crispy
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 8:57 pm

Re: Fence treatment to deter neighbour's ivy?

Postby alyson » Fri Jul 14, 2017 9:38 am

But you can remove the ivy attached to your fence panel and allow it to trail on your neighbours garden. You don't have to tolerate the ivy on your fence.
alyson
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2014 1:43 pm
Location: Wales

Ads are not endorsed by www.gardenlaw.co.uk or the staff thereof and visitors should perform their own due diligence on the product or service offered.
 
Next

Return to Fences

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 4 guests