cutting leylandii down to size

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ecudc
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cutting leylandii down to size

Post by ecudc » Wed Oct 18, 2006 5:57 pm

Hi there,

We've just moved into a new house and have received 3 astronomical quotes for reducing a leylandii hedge (aprox 10 trees) from 40 to 10 ft. It would be cheaper for us to buy chainsaw, helmet, scaffolding (or really long ladder), chainsaw suit and probably a Tudor suit of armour than to get it done by a surgeon.....We are therefore considering doing it ourselves.

Has anyone got any experience of this and could offer some advice?

despair
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Post by despair » Wed Oct 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Leylandi= cheap to buy =impossible to control = bloomin expensive to get rid of = a nasty accident in the hands of amateurs

subjecttocontract
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Post by subjecttocontract » Thu Oct 19, 2006 8:16 am

despair wrote:Leylandi= cheap to buy =impossible to control = bloomin expensive to get rid of = a nasty accident in the hands of amateurs
Not an opinion shared by everyone.

Leylandi = cheap to buy, easy to grow, evergreen, hardy, take abuse, look great in the right location, minimum maintenance etc etc.
Almost everything I say is tinged with irony !

despair
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Post by despair » Thu Oct 19, 2006 8:35 am

Only in the right location

Mininum maintenance they definitely are not

Destructive of surrounding soil they definitely are

andrew54
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Post by andrew54 » Thu Oct 19, 2006 9:08 am

despair wrote:
Mininum maintenance they definitely are not

Destructive of surrounding soil they definitely are

I have been looking after my leylandii hedge for 26 years. It is fairly minimal maintenance. It only needs a cut once a year, sometimes twice. I have no evidence that it has affected the soil at all.

The problem now is that it is very thick, about 3 feet, and it is very difficult to lower. The trunks are too thick to cut with loppers, but too springy to cut with a handsaw.

amit
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Post by amit » Thu Oct 19, 2006 9:57 am

and they will continue to grow andrew54.
The are defintely not minimum maintenance! Needs trimming at least twice a year to keep it under control, If left alonethey can grow at least 30ft, block out light, ruins the soil taking up all the water which you cannot grow anything else next to it.
I sure a lot of people do look after them and keep it under control, but the problem start if it get left alone! I think iit should be banned from garden centres or at least provide a warning on the for future purchasers in case they do not kno what menance it causes etc.

arborlad
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Post by arborlad » Thu Oct 19, 2006 10:12 am

Leylandii,like any other hedging plant,is only as good or as bad as the attention it gets,after planting. If it's allowed to get to,say,6ft wide,trying to reduce it to 3ft,is near impossible,if it's kept at 3ft,from when it is first planted,it's a perfectly manageable task.

As for killing the soil,I've pulled out many leyandii hedges and succesfully planted afterwards,with no more than a bit of mulch to 'liven' things up a bit. You can't say that about privet,any time I've pulled a privet hedge out,I've had to do a fair amount of excavation to get rid of 'dead' soil,before re-planting can be done.

arborlad

subjecttocontract
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Post by subjecttocontract » Thu Oct 19, 2006 10:16 am

Let me make it clear for those of you that are having trouble with the English language......

MY definition of a low maintenance conifer = those that require a trim once or twice per year.

I'm sure all the gardeners amongst you have lots of other plants that require more maintenannce than that.
Almost everything I say is tinged with irony !

subjecttocontract
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Post by subjecttocontract » Thu Oct 19, 2006 10:23 am

One of my gardeners uses a hedge trimmer with an extension arm. I hadn't seen one of these tools before but, the extension allows him to keep both feet on the ground and trim/ top/ shape a 12/14ft conifer.

Obviously we are talking of a hedge trimmer.....not a chain saw, so it will only trim the branch thickness that the hedge trimmer is designed to handle.

This might be usefull for some people who perhaps don't know that such a beast exists.....
Almost everything I say is tinged with irony !

arborlad
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Post by arborlad » Thu Oct 19, 2006 10:42 am

You can also get 'pole saws',these are chainsaws with the engine at one end of a long pole and the cutting head at the other,in the right hands you can get good results. It could be used for lowering a hedge,but you have the problem of being able to see what you are cutting.

When I've had to work on a hedge that is a bit 'whippy',I've lashed a scaffold board at right angles to the top of the ladder and rested this against the hedge,it spreads the load and 'stiffens' everything up. The added advantage of this is that,as you move the ladder along,you're maintaining the same height - beware though,H&S,would frown on it these days.

arborlad

black dog
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Post by black dog » Thu Oct 19, 2006 12:39 pm

My father-in law used to spray his leylandi and privet with a product from the garden centre which ment the hedges ony needed to be cut once a year as it slowed the growth down so much. his leylandi hedge stayed at 6 feet for the 20 years he lived at the property.

shaz.davies
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cutlass

Post by shaz.davies » Sat Oct 21, 2006 2:15 pm

I've sen this stuff, I think it's called cutlass, cutlas, something.
trying to put right 40 years of hassle...problems with neighbors, etc.

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