Archery

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Ultimate_death
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Archery

Post by Ultimate_death » Thu Jan 19, 2006 4:41 pm

I'm just wondering what the general laws are considering home archery as i was hoping to start doing archery at home. Is it legal to shoot a 20lb bow into a target down my garden? (using a proper target and 8' by 9' safety net behind it). Bear in mind i have neighbours on either side and behind (where i would be shooting towards from my house(There is both a solid wood fence and safety net) but they are friendly so it is only really legality i'm worried about rather than grumpy neighbours.
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Conveyancer
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Post by Conveyancer » Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:41 pm

I recommend asking the police. No idea if a bow and arrow is classed as an offensive weapon when used in the backgarden. Your local archery club may be able to give advice about safety precautions. Probably unwise if you are a beginner or allow beginners to practice. Some years ago (before the guns laws changed) I did a lease of an outdoor shooting range - the safety zone was considerably wider and longer than the range and even extended behind the firing points. If you get the go ahead get some insurance.

Ultimate_death
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Post by Ultimate_death » Fri Jan 20, 2006 3:46 pm

Thanks for the advice and while i'm no expert i'd expect to hit the inner or outer bull in 9 of 10 shots. Just a question: what do you mean by insurance? i presume you mean insurance against stray arrows damaging property (i doubt i could damage anything of value enough to make it worth it) but i'm not sure. Thanks again.

Maverick.uk
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Post by Maverick.uk » Fri Jan 20, 2006 5:45 pm

Ultimate_death wrote:Thanks for the advice and while i'm no expert i'd expect to hit the inner or outer bull in 9 of 10 shots. Just a question: what do you mean by insurance? i presume you mean insurance against stray arrows damaging property (i doubt i could damage anything of value enough to make it worth it) but i'm not sure. Thanks again.
Public liability case you kill someone.

Does the archery association print guidelines for ranges? If so stick to it.

Cheers

Mav

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Post by Conveyancer » Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:15 pm

...and not only death but injury. The injury need not be that serious to be expensive. You don't want to leave someone who has just started on a modelling career with a facial scar.

Ultimate_death
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Post by Ultimate_death » Sat Jan 21, 2006 4:00 pm

Well, i never relised you could insure against killing people, isn't that kind of like blood money. I can see where it helps in injuries though and i guess it might pay a court case (if someone isn't happy that i shot them)?
Thanks again i'm now looking into insurance

EDIT: Only joking about the killing bit :)... or was i
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Last edited by Ultimate_death on Sat Jan 21, 2006 6:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Conveyancer
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Post by Conveyancer » Sat Jan 21, 2006 6:26 pm

Ultimate_death wrote:Well, i never relised you could insure again killing people
It has to be accidental!

Ultimate_death
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Post by Ultimate_death » Sun Jan 22, 2006 12:21 pm

I live in quite a small village so the police centre is just there for show it's normally empty. Is there some other way to get the information because i can't get it form the local police and i can't find it online anywhere i've looked. Plus, does anyone know the basic regulation for archery, such as distance you need empty wide of the target for it to be considered safe. Thanks

carpinus
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Post by carpinus » Sun Jan 22, 2006 1:17 pm

If you have already bought the archery gear then go back to the supplier for the reg's. If not, then approach your preferred supplier for advice before you purchase. After all, you are going to have to have a bow etc appropriate for your size of range & not something with the power/range of our Longbowmen at Agincourt.

Conveyancer
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Post by Conveyancer » Sun Jan 22, 2006 2:04 pm

Pose your question here: http://www.gnas.org/contactus.cfm

Ultimate_death
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Post by Ultimate_death » Sun Jan 22, 2006 5:56 pm

thanks, i checked that site but didn't notice the contact bit.

Maverick.uk
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Post by Maverick.uk » Sun Jan 22, 2006 6:08 pm

Ultimate_death wrote:thanks, i checked that site but didn't notice the contact bit.
When i did this, we shot indoors and had a huge net draped at the rear to catch any stray arrows. Nobody was allowed forward of the firing line period. Dont know how you would get on in the out doors though.

Like others have suggested you need more advice before stretching the bow :)

Cheers

Mav

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Post by Treeman » Sun Jan 22, 2006 7:37 pm

Giving consideration to whatever best practice is in force for archery is a good start but I would urge you to tread carefully. No matter how careful you are or how good your insurance is, if you do someone harm you will likely find yourself on the wrong end of a prosecution.

Key to the safety of this activity would be a risk assessment. This involves identifying the potential hazards, and taking steps to manage the risk. Insurers often insist on a risk assessment as a mandatory condition.

For shooting ranges (firearms) the only way to remove the risk to people is to exclude them from the downrange area. I would suggest this is the same for archery. It would seem then that the only way to manage the risk would be to shoot within an enclosure from which the projectile cannot escape (a building) or to remove any people from the downrange area.

I would think shooting towards a residence without adequately managing these risks would be considered reckless.

Treeman

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Angelisle
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Post by Angelisle » Sun Jan 22, 2006 8:54 pm

UD
thanks, i checked that site but didn't notice the contact bit.
Conveyancer gave a valid link, for you to post your question on, click on the link and its right in front of your eyes, or could your name be Harold :wink: http://www.gnas.org/contactus.cfm
www.islandpulse.co.uk
www.digitalfoyer.com
www.iwdig.org.uk

nigelrb
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Post by nigelrb » Mon Jan 23, 2006 6:10 pm

Hi Ultimate,
I'm just wondering, as this seems to be causing you so much concern and stress, whether it may be just a little easier to practice the 'condensed version' of archery?

Just chuck up a dart board on the nearest tree - you won't even need insurance :wink:
Cheers, Nigel
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