Drainage: The water has to go somewhere!

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Uriah Heap
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Post by Uriah Heap » Tue Oct 09, 2007 10:36 pm

i dont have a university education (why did you jump to that conclusion?) but even i can see you need a robust filling medium that would occupy a significant (non-zero) fraction of this volume.

you are actually incorrect when you say that soakaways are no longer filled with rock and rubble. many are.

by the way, why would the absence of a university education automatically endow someone with a knowledge of soakaway fillers? maybe you should sign up for an undergraduate course on logic :lol:

carpinus
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Post by carpinus » Wed Oct 10, 2007 7:51 am

Uriah Heap wrote:
you are actually incorrect when you say that soakaways are no longer filled with rock and rubble. many are.
But that doesn't create a soakaway, just a rubble filled hole.
A soakaway is an empty space, apart from the sidewall supporting structure, which allows the collected water to soak away.
(secondary modern school)

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Stoday
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Post by Stoday » Wed Oct 10, 2007 11:37 am

Uriah Heap wrote: i dont have a university education (why did you jump to that conclusion?)
It's a joke. That's why I added a :lol: . Subject to contract & Little Miss Sunshine have expressed opposing views on university education, which I think is irrelevant to this forum. So I joke about it.
Uriah Heap wrote: you are actually incorrect when you say that soakaways are no longer filled with rock and rubble. many are.
That's only true for the majority of existing soakaways. The subject of discussion was new soakaways. Rock filled soakaways are now uneconomic (if you work out the sums). http://www.pavingexpert.com/drain08.html

Uriah Heap
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Post by Uriah Heap » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:51 pm

dont worry stoday - i didnt take offence. i also regard the discussion here about university education as a bit of joke. thats why i also inserted a :lol: in my posts

im sure you know carpinus that soakaways come in various designs - some more modern than others, some more efficient than others. however the empty space between the rocks etc. in traditional constructions serves the same purpose - they are still called soakaways (if you want a definition look in a dictionary).

having recently built 27 soakaways on one particular site Stoday, using locally sourced rock and rubble, i would say the economics of it really depends where you get the rock / rubble from. the filling didn't cost a penny -and on this particular site these soakaways work very well.

arborlad
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Re: Drainage: The water has to go somewhere!

Post by arborlad » Mon May 27, 2019 10:44 am

Rosenberg wrote:
Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:08 pm
Could someone please give me some advice on a drainage issue?

My house is built on the top of a hill such that the back garden (16m wide by 20m long) slopes down towards the rear and left boundaries. Each boundary consists of a four-foot high earth bank (planted on top with quickthorn etc). On the other sides of the banks are a field and a private lane.

The problem is that the hedgebanks (consisting of heavy clay soil) trap all surface rainwater within my garden, so the lowest corner (about 30 or 40 square metres) looks like a large dirty swimming pool during the winter months.

Unfortunately, I can't remove the hedgebanks because their presence is a condition imposed by the Local Authority when they granted planning permission for our house. The only solution has been for me to install drainage pipes through the base of the banks - which I have done this summer.

However, the owner of the adjoining field and lane is now complaining about the water draining onto his land. Another neighbour living two fields away, down the hill, is also complaining about water "cascading" down the lane and onto his property. I can't see that the run-off from my garden is causing either of these neighbours any problems - especially when you consider that my garden's rain catchment area is only about 320 square metres, and most of that water is draining onto a 6000 square metre field used only for grazing.

Unfortunately, the rainwater has got to go somewhere - I can't make it flow uphill. And anyway, before the hedgebanks were built, the water would have run off into the field naturally.

Can anyone advise me of the legality of the situation? Have I done the wrong thing in installing the drainage pipes? I would be grateful for any suggestions.

Thanks.



Does the same situation exist today - or have you made any changes?
arborlad

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Rosenberg
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Re: Drainage: The water has to go somewhere!

Post by Rosenberg » Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:48 am

arborlad wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 10:44 am
Rosenberg wrote:
Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:08 pm
Could someone please give me some advice on a drainage issue?

My house is built on the top of a hill such that the back garden (16m wide by 20m long) slopes down towards the rear and left boundaries. Each boundary consists of a four-foot high earth bank (planted on top with quickthorn etc). On the other sides of the banks are a field and a private lane.

The problem is that the hedgebanks (consisting of heavy clay soil) trap all surface rainwater within my garden, so the lowest corner (about 30 or 40 square metres) looks like a large dirty swimming pool during the winter months.

Unfortunately, I can't remove the hedgebanks because their presence is a condition imposed by the Local Authority when they granted planning permission for our house. The only solution has been for me to install drainage pipes through the base of the banks - which I have done this summer.

However, the owner of the adjoining field and lane is now complaining about the water draining onto his land. Another neighbour living two fields away, down the hill, is also complaining about water "cascading" down the lane and onto his property. I can't see that the run-off from my garden is causing either of these neighbours any problems - especially when you consider that my garden's rain catchment area is only about 320 square metres, and most of that water is draining onto a 6000 square metre field used only for grazing.

Unfortunately, the rainwater has got to go somewhere - I can't make it flow uphill. And anyway, before the hedgebanks were built, the water would have run off into the field naturally.

Can anyone advise me of the legality of the situation? Have I done the wrong thing in installing the drainage pipes? I would be grateful for any suggestions.

Thanks.



Does the same situation exist today - or have you made any changes?
My last post said it all. It is not material to this thread, but the farmer has since seen the error of his ways and left. Unsurprisingly, the new farmer hasn't even noticed any water.

arborlad
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Re: Drainage: The water has to go somewhere!

Post by arborlad » Sun Jun 02, 2019 8:44 am

arborlad wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 10:44 am

Does the same situation exist today - or have you made any changes?


...................so the correct and honest answer here is, yes!!................no changes have been made!!




Rosenberg wrote:
Sun May 26, 2019 6:27 pm
You don't know what I am doing. You haven't visited my garden (unless you've been stalking me in real life as well), and you certainly don't have any evidence for your assertion. Water runs off higher land onto lower land naturally. That's basic physics. There is no requirement for us to install a drain. Nothing illegal is occurring. You assumed otherwise - and, again, you were wrong to do so.



.................which makes the above statement a lie!! There's nothing new about members being evasive and not answering questions - but you seem to excel at it.

Your bluff and bluster doesn't fool me - it never has!
arborlad

smile...it confuses people

arborlad
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Re: Drainage: The water has to go somewhere!

Post by arborlad » Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:01 pm

Rosenberg wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:48 am
.......... the farmer has since seen the error of his ways and left. Unsurprisingly, the new farmer hasn't even noticed any water.



Probably the most crass comment you've ever made on this forum.................I look forward to the day the farmer sees the error of your ways and takes the kind of action that farmers are more willing and able to take and you return to the forum squealing like a stuck pig, complaining about the injustice of it all :roll:
arborlad

smile...it confuses people

Rosenberg
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Re: Drainage: The water has to go somewhere!

Post by Rosenberg » Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:53 am

arborlad wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:01 pm
Rosenberg wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:48 am
.......... the farmer has since seen the error of his ways and left. Unsurprisingly, the new farmer hasn't even noticed any water.
Probably the most crass comment you've ever made on this forum.................I look forward to the day the farmer sees the error of your ways and takes the kind of action that farmers are more willing and able to take and you return to the forum squealing like a stuck pig, complaining about the injustice of it all :roll:
If you were properly acquainted with the situation you would realise that, rather than being a 'crass comment' is just a concise statement of fact. However, as I have already said, you are just guessing about the details.

Anyway, what prompted that silly little rant? You sound like despair. Have you been on the Babycham, arborlad?


arborlad wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 8:44 am
arborlad wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 10:44 am

Does the same situation exist today - or have you made any changes?
...................so the correct and honest answer here is, yes!!................no changes have been made!!
Rosenberg wrote:
Sun May 26, 2019 6:27 pm
You don't know what I am doing. You haven't visited my garden (unless you've been stalking me in real life as well), and you certainly don't have any evidence for your assertion. Water runs off higher land onto lower land naturally. That's basic physics. There is no requirement for us to install a drain. Nothing illegal is occurring. You assumed otherwise - and, again, you were wrong to do so.
.................which makes the above statement a lie!! There's nothing new about members being evasive and not answering questions - but you seem to excel at it.

Your bluff and bluster doesn't fool me - it never has!
What exactly do you regard as a lie?

The situation is as described. You seem to be deliberately 'misunderstanding' it.

The distribution of water resulting from the drainage pipes I installed is not materially different from natural drainage. (I have already said that in the quadcopter thread.) Hence, there is nothing illegal going on. There is no basis for any complaint and no need for me to install the further drainage / soak pits/ pumps etc. which you imply I should have done.

In reality, drainage has never been a problem. The previous farmer complained only because he didn't like the new buildings that had been erected near his fields. The current farmer is more reasonable and hasn't even noticed any water, let alone regarded it as a problem.

That's about the extent of the situation. There has been nothing more of relevance to add to this thread for several years now - that is until you started wittering on about it again.

It is all pretty simple arborlad. Why are you unable to grasp it?


PS If you want to continue arguing with me you can do so in the 'Quad-copter" thread; I won't be contributing to this one again unless something relevant occurs.

PPS I know you're getting annoyed and over-tired, but really one exclamation mark will suffice. Two in succession is unnecessary and a sign of poor literacy. Perhaps you should just try to calm down a bit. Deep-breathing exercises might help. Or you could try naturism - it's very relaxing.

arborlad
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Re: Drainage: The water has to go somewhere!

Post by arborlad » Mon Jun 03, 2019 10:27 am

Rosenberg wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:53 am

The situation is as described. You seem to be deliberately 'misunderstanding' it.



You must deal with your own surface water within your own demise - that is well established law. You are not doing that - you are shedding it onto land you do not own.........

Whenever you are in the wrong and those wrongs are pointed out to you, your fall-back position is to state that you have been deliberately misunderstood - no - you haven't!!
arborlad

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arborlad
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Re: Drainage: The water has to go somewhere!

Post by arborlad » Sat Jul 06, 2019 10:47 am

Rosenberg wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 12:53 am
There is no requirement for us to install a drain. Nothing illegal is occurring.
.................which makes the above statement a lie!! There's nothing new about members being evasive and not answering questions - but you seem to excel at it.

Your bluff and bluster doesn't fool me - it never has!
[/quote]
What exactly do you regard as a lie?
[/quote]




The bit in blue - not in your wildest dreams can you install pipes into a hedgebank of unknown ownership* and consider it 'lawful' and 'natural'!!!



*Absent anything to the contrary, the balance of probabilities is with you on this one.
arborlad

smile...it confuses people

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