Are householders legally required to recycle?

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appledore
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Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by appledore »

Hugh Jaleak wrote:. Providing a sensible house to house refuse collection service has to be superior (and cheaper) than clearing rubbish from layby's, gateways, ditches etc.....
I agree. It's hard work getting rid of rubbish now. I can't see how someone could be fined for putting rubbish in the wrong bin. How could they prove who'd actually put it in when bins have to be taken out onto the street to be emptied? It could be anyone.
Keep calm and carry on.
JohnP1950
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Location: Coventry

Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by JohnP1950 »

That's a good point Appledore, thanks. And thanks to everyone else for their suggestions as well. I am grateful to you for taking the time to post.

I have written to the Deputy Chief of the Waste department today saying I don't want the bins, have nowhere to store them, and that they should collect them within 14 days otherwise I will dispose of them myself. I will post it Recorded Delivery tomorrow. For the moment, I have left the bins outside on the footpath for collection as I have nowhere else to put them, so I expect that will cause trouble if it goes against council policy or is a health and safety issue etc. I shall be expecting a knock on the door from somebody with a peaked cap and clipboard ... I'll keep you informed of what happens (if anything).

Thanks again for the advice.
Hugh Jaleak
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Location: Northamptonshire

Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by Hugh Jaleak »

"Who decides who gets how manys bins?" It is the responsibility of the individual Local Authority responsible for the collection of waste how they want to achieve this. Usually (I think) the Council's waste department (probably headed up by someone with a degree in something irrelevant but employed on a £30-40K salary at taxpayers expense) decides on a method, then puts this proposal to the elected Councillors who (usually because they believe this person obviously knows what they are talking about as thats why they pay them so much....) simply rubber stamp it. It then gets foisted on the householders.....

I used to work for a company who were contracted by the Local Authority to provides such services, it never ceased to amaze me what hair brained ideas these Council people came up with. The amount of fuel wasted by switching to new 'state of the art' (Councils words) refuse collection trucks was unbelieveable, the new trucks used 3x as much as the old versions. Any 'green' gains by picking up recyclate and refuse in the same vehicle must have been far outweighed by the extra emissions from the engines!

A lorry was told to return to a site to realign the bottle banks as one was a whole inch out of line with the others..... 'Marked' bags were put out to check the collection teams were putting the recycling in the right compartment on the collection vehicle, there were even Council staff 'hiding' in residents homes, spying on the collection crews to make sure they weren't doing anything naughty! :shock:

All people want is the bl**dy bins emptied once a week and the streets cleaned!
arsie
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Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by arsie »

Our local council Breckland allows you to put out rubbish in plastic bags in exceptional circumstances although most people use wheelie bins. Our neighbours (end of terrace) only have front door access to the street and that's what they do. Breckland are one of the most efficient councils in the country I believe.
ukmicky
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Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by ukmicky »

The goverment were going to removes the power councils have to fin someone for not recycling. I am not sure if it has happened yet.
Any information provided is not legal advice and you are advised to gain a professional opinion
JohnP1950
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Location: Coventry

Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by JohnP1950 »

ukmicky wrote:The goverment were going to removes the power councils have to fin someone for not recycling. I am not sure if it has happened yet.
So they do (or did) have powers to fine people for not recycling?

Just a brief update.

No joy from the council so I took the three bins I don't need to the tip. It required two trips in the car. The first one went off OK with no trouble from the tip personnel: the second trip, when I was depositing the final bin, a council jobsworth in a fluorescent jacket "had words" with me - and I him. The upshot is that I refused to take the bin back, but had my car's number plate noted down. I have since received a letter from the council accusing me of theft of council property and fly tipping. (I don't know how they work those two out as the bins and the tip are their property.)

I'm sure it's all bluster, but I replied to their letter, which was from someone else in the waste department, pointing out the impracticalities of having to store so many bins when I have no garden. I hope this person will take more notice.

Perhaps Eric Pickles' recent proclamation will help them to see sense?

Meanwhile, I will continue to put all my recyclables in with the non-recyclable waste. I have no option. (They told me I don't have to use council waste services, but I would not get a rebate on my Council Tax if I arrange for a private collection - you can't win.)
kipper
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Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by kipper »

Ha ha, good for you! You don't have to use council waste services but cannot refuse (pun intended!) their bins! How does that work then?!
Hugh Jaleak
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Location: Northamptonshire

Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by Hugh Jaleak »

Should the Council be daft enough to prosecute (and I wouldnt put it past them....) it would be interesting to hear their defence. The OP has contacted them on several occasions regarding the issue, they've dug their heels firmly in and refused to see sense so when people take matters into their own hands the Council doesnt like it.....

A clear offer was made to return the bins, it was refused, so the bins were taken to the recycling centre. All staff had to do was put the bins on one side and arrange for their return to the correct site where they could be re-issued to another property! How it can be flytipping when the 'waste' is being deposited at a licensed facility for waste disposal is beyond me.....

I sincerely hope should the muppets decide to pursue the matter that they end up with (a lot) of egg on their smug faces.... :lol:

Oh, and if the 'Campaign For Real Recycling' get their way then everyone could end up with multiple containers, as they want to see material seperated at source prior to collection. (Which could also mean every Council operating a 'Co-mingled' system whereas material is collected in a single container then mass sorted at a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), would be forced to rethink their collection policy.....)
kipper
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Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by kipper »

With regard to theft & fly tipping, I very much doubt the CPS would entertain these muppets.
Geometer
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Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by Geometer »

jonahinoz wrote:
<<<Garden waste that can be composted is a different matter, as it can cause build up of methane in landfill>>>
What's the difference between methane generated in a landfill, and methane generated in my garden?
It's the difference between anaerobic decomposition (i.e. without oxygen - landfill) which produces both methane and carbon dioxide, and aerobic decomposition (i.e. with oxygen - compost) which only produces carbon dioxide. Methane is a more significant "greenhouse gas" than CO2, and is also a potential fire hazard.
JohnP1950
Posts: 180
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 6:17 pm
Location: Coventry

Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by JohnP1950 »

At last a letter from the council accepting my reasons for returning the bins and confirming they will not prosecute "on this occasion". Do they think I'll need to do it again?

They have also conveniently missed the point about the semi-robotic, computer-says-no jobsworths who man their telephone lines, but I suppose I should be grateful the absurdity of the situation is finally beginning to dawn on someone there.

They go on to say:

"Whilst we accept the space you have to accommodate rwheelie [sic] bins is limited budgetary contraints mean that it is not possible for XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX Council to make exceptions to our policy for everyone in such circumstances. I must emphasize that unwanted refuse bins may not be deposited at any of the Authorities [sic] civic amenity centres because of the inherent Health and Safety and other legal issues. If you have any queries about your refuse collection service in the future please contact our Customer Care Representatives on our XXXXXX XXXX help line - XXXXX XXXXXX who will be pleased to assist you."

Hardly an apology; more of a badly written face-saving exercise. As this person works for the local authority you would expect them to know the difference between "Authorities" and "Authority's". I think their change of heart over a prosecution might be down to me threatening to publicise their stupidity in the local papers and on the internet (I mentioned Garden Law).

Anyway, thanks to everyone who has contributed to my thread for your support.

John.
jonahinoz
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Re: Are householders legally required to recycle?

Post by jonahinoz »

Hi,

If it is YOUR bin, you should be entitled to do what you want with it.

If the bin belongs to the council, what right have they to deposit it on your property? Is there any legislation that allows them to do so? Would "un-solicited goods" legislation cover its disposal?

A wheely-bin costs about £50, but probably less to the Council. Surely there is sufficient saving to pay foy somebody to be in charge of not distibuting unwanted bins. Perhaps each bin allocated earns somebody a free lunch?

Do you have a neighbour, corner shop, or other small business who would store your bin, and place it (full) outside your gate on bin day? :twisted:

John W
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