European Larch

European Larch

Postby BelindaB » Mon Nov 06, 2017 9:13 pm

I have a European Larch in my garden, at least I think that's what it is. It looks like a conifer but it's now shedding its needles/leaves after they've turned a lovely golden colour.
Over the years I believe my neighbour has cut the top off the tree and shaped the sides, so it is completely flat on top and there were no branches at the sides. The old owner of my property said the neighbour would do her 'favours' like this, but I think they don't like the tree, even though it's not restricting light. It is tall (about 10ft, but the branches have always been cut off, so we ended up with a tree shaped like a flat-topped lollipop! It's like topiary, and looks stupid)

Since I moved in it has been growing but today I noticed my neighbour has cut their side (which ever so slightly invades their air space), but has also cut around it, so the tree is curved again now and the new growth has been cut off. I'm trying to let it grow yet they're cutting more than they should.
We have already had words about other shrubs on my land that they don't like. I'm trying to avoid talking to them about it because I feel a bit bullied.

Will it recover from being pruned so heavily? Is there anything I can do to help it recover? And how can I approach the neighbour without seeming like I'm as annoyed as I am? :|
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Re: European Larch

Postby stufe35 » Mon Nov 06, 2017 11:24 pm

Just confirm to them politely that they are allowed to trim it back to the boundary line and no more, no matter what arrangement they previously had that is now null and void. If people are upset by the truth that is their problem. Most people chunter then accept it...for what else can they do ? It's your tree and your garden. If they want to say what happens in it they should have bought it whilst it was for sale.
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Re: European Larch

Postby SJC14 » Wed Jan 03, 2018 12:48 pm

Put a tall fence up or chicken wire secured on poles to protect the tree at the boundary...sometimes physical barriers are the only way. A lot of people hate neighbours trees, very unnatural but they are seen as a threat or something.
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Re: European Larch

Postby mr sheen » Wed Jan 03, 2018 9:05 pm

You need to accept that if your vegetation invades the airspace owned by a neighbour, this is considered a legal nuisance for which self-help is considered a reasonable and legal response. They do not need to provide notice and whilst it would be nice if they engaged expensive experts to carry out the works, they are unlikley to do so and will cut back as they can in the exercise of their rights. They should cut back only to the boundary but the problem with this rule is that trees continue to grow so if you take this minutia to court you will get a ticking off and have no financial losses so will also have a hefty costs bill....so pretty pointless arguing when the deed has already been done.

So if you want to prevent someone else exercising their rights by cutting back your vegetation, you could prevent it invading their property by keeping it cut well back yourself. This also avoids having to discuss the matter with them.
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Re: European Larch

Postby BelindaB » Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:45 pm

Unfortunately I can't put a tall fence up due to covenants. That was the intention (like all others in the neighbourhood have done), but my neighbour made it clear he would take things down the legal route if I did.

I never mentioned court action for cutting my plants - apart from a cease and desist letter (elsewhere on forum), if they cut more than they should again. It got to the stage last year that I was reluctant to go out for a day because I was anxious about what I might find when I got back. I think it's human nature to want to protect what you own.
If I could cut 'their' side I would, but I would have to stand on their land. They are welcome to cut anything they like that invades their airspace (and we are talking centimetres), but I object to them shaping it round the sides and on the top - the sides and top are most definitely on my land.
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Re: European Larch

Postby MacadamB53 » Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:59 pm

Hi BelindaB,

If I could cut 'their' side I would, but I would have to stand on their land.

that’s what they’d have to do - and have been doing - so I don’t imagine they’d have a problem with you doing it.

kind regards, Mac
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Re: European Larch

Postby BelindaB » Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:18 pm

MacadamB53 wrote:Hi BelindaB,

If I could cut 'their' side I would, but I would have to stand on their land.

that’s what they’d have to do - and have been doing - so I don’t imagine they’d have a problem with you doing it.

kind regards, Mac


No, they've been cutting from their side. The bloke stands on long ladders and just leans over. I've since popped a note through the door saying if my shrubs/trees go over the boundary to please let me know and I'll gladly come around and cut it. No response yet, but then again I didn't want one, I just want them to stop cutting my plants the way they like them.
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Re: European Larch

Postby mr sheen » Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:55 pm

They don't need to respond and don't have to grant you access to their land to cut your vegetation which is what your note is requesting.They do not have to inform you if your vegetation encroaches on their land and wait for you to cut it back at your leisure, they can legitimately can get the loppers out and get chopping.

If you don't want them to cut back keep it within your boundary.
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Re: European Larch

Postby Collaborate » Tue Jan 23, 2018 7:33 am

mr sheen wrote:If you don't want them to cut back keep it within your boundary.


This is what OP has suggested by offering to cut it back for them. Have I missed something?
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Re: European Larch

Postby BelindaB » Wed Jan 24, 2018 2:20 pm

Collaborate wrote:
mr sheen wrote:If you don't want them to cut back keep it within your boundary.


This is what OP has suggested by offering to cut it back for them. Have I missed something?


I think I have.
Short of climbing up a slope every week, clinging onto the tree and putting a ladder up it to measure the branches that are 'potentially' overhanging (by centimetres), there's not a lot more I can do.
And try doing that when you're disabled (which next door are aware of)
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