Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post Reply
debs0701
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2021 7:13 am

Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by debs0701 »

Hi all,

My next door neighbour has a considerable amount of marestail weed in his front garden. This is all along his front hedge and also in his lawn.

He's never treated the weed and when mowing his lawn, he's just taking the tops off which only promotes faster growth.

This weed is a real problem as it grows underground and sprouts up, even through concrete, tarmac etc.

We're an open plan estate and not only does this look unsightly, it is now spreading on to our driveway. We had our driveway renovated just over a year ago with resin and I've just noticed a piece of the weed that has come up through the resin.

I'm obviously going to be asking him to get it professionally treated but I'm pretty confident he won't do anything as he is someone who doesn't spend any money on his property. I think he may probably just pull the weeds out, but that isn't going to resolve the issue.

Does anyone know how I stand with this? Could my neighbour be forced to take action on it? Could he be made to pay if we have to have some of our driveway dug up to deal with it?

Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Debbie
Eliza
Posts: 442
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:28 am

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by Eliza »

I know there's some sort of law re letting Japanese Knotweed spread to neighbours gardens and fines can be imposed on the miscreant neighbour. Wonder if that applies to other troublesome weeds too? Might be worth investigating.

Sympathies re this starting to appear. It got me worried one time when I discovered there was a tiny bit of this that had appeared from somewhere and was growing in my garden and I dealt with it by getting out my nail scissors (as it was only a few inches literally where it was popping up between paving stones). I trimmed it RIGHT down, poured boiling water over it and blocked its light by placing a loose bit of paving stone over it (as I presume these plants also require sunlight to photosynthesise?). Did it a couple of times and it did the trick and I've had all the paving in my garden up since then to replace it and there wasn't a sign of it.
Apologies for not giving exact personal details in my posts - you never know who is reading....
debs0701
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2021 7:13 am

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by debs0701 »

Thanks Eliza, I'll google it to see if I can find anything out about any law. Glad it all worked out for you. You spotted it at the right time and dealt with it before it got out of control. I'm going to try and keep on top of this piece but it worries me how much more of this is going to spread over from my neighbours !
MacadamB53
Posts: 8763
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 11:13 pm
Number of Posts per Page: 100
Number of topics per page: 50

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by MacadamB53 »

debs0701 wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 6:26 am Hi all,

My next door neighbour has a considerable amount of marestail weed in his front garden. This is all along his front hedge and also in his lawn.

He's never treated the weed and when mowing his lawn, he's just taking the tops off which only promotes faster growth.

This weed is a real problem as it grows underground and sprouts up, even through concrete, tarmac etc.

We're an open plan estate and not only does this look unsightly, it is now spreading on to our driveway. We had our driveway renovated just over a year ago with resin and I've just noticed a piece of the weed that has come up through the resin.

I'm obviously going to be asking him to get it professionally treated but I'm pretty confident he won't do anything as he is someone who doesn't spend any money on his property. I think he may probably just pull the weeds out, but that isn't going to resolve the issue.

Does anyone know how I stand with this? Could my neighbour be forced to take action on it? Could he be made to pay if we have to have some of our driveway dug up to deal with it?

Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Debbie
these are weeds - put there by Mother Nature - rather than your neighbour’s property
debs0701
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2021 7:13 am

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by debs0701 »

Mac,

Very helpful reply.... not..... if you can't be helpful, don't bother replying!
MacadamB53
Posts: 8763
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 11:13 pm
Number of Posts per Page: 100
Number of topics per page: 50

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by MacadamB53 »

debs0701 wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 10:57 am Mac,

Very helpful reply.... not..... if you can't be helpful, don't bother replying!
I don’t think this particular plant comes under any legislative controls, so I’m afraid you can’t hold your neighbour responsible - is that helpful?
debs0701
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2021 7:13 am

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by debs0701 »

Yes, thanks
alyson
Posts: 109
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2014 1:43 pm
Number of Posts per Page: 10
Number of topics per page: 10
Location: Wales

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by alyson »

It’s a war of attrition with mares tail I’m afraid..
Best product we have found is Curtail, not cheap but it works. Be prepared to spray weekly, prowling around your drive to zap shoots as they appear.
Eliza
Posts: 442
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:28 am

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by Eliza »

Neighbours are responsible if they know they have a problem plant and don't take necessary measures to deal with it before it becomes a problem to their neighbours.

I think there are several plants that neighbours are obliged to deal with legally if they happen - though I couldnt say which they are besides Japanese Knotweed and it would need checking on a case-by-case basis. There is always a moral obligation to deal with any troublesome plant anyway.

Personally I am in the school of thought of taking "direct action" if need be. When I spotted the dead-looking remnants of a plant on public sector ground near my home I knew there was only two things it could be - Japanese Knotweed or bamboo - and I didnt like the idea of either. So - just in case it wasnt as dead as it looked - and whilst it was still only a 1' or so wide - it got 2 cans of petrol poured over it and then a container of quick-setting cement and there hasn't been a peep out of it since. Leylandii are also a problem and everyone knows they are - but some antisocial people still deliberately plant them on their ground near neighbours boundaries even so - and there's no legal remedy for solitary leylandii - but several instances of "watering" them with Round-Up deals with the problem and they go brown and die.
Apologies for not giving exact personal details in my posts - you never know who is reading....
mr sheen
Posts: 2790
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2009 2:33 pm

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by mr sheen »

Eliza wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 8:05 pm Neighbours are responsible if they know they have a problem plant and don't take necessary measures to deal with it before it becomes a problem to their neighbours.

I think there are several plants that neighbours are obliged to deal with legally if they happen - though I couldnt say which they are besides Japanese Knotweed and it would need checking on a case-by-case basis. There is always a moral obligation to deal with any troublesome plant anyway.

Moral obligation…who is the morality monitor? Very misleading nonesense

Personally I am in the school of thought of taking "direct action" if need be. When I spotted the dead-looking remnants of a plant on public sector ground near my home I knew there was only two things it could be - Japanese Knotweed or bamboo - and I didnt like the idea of either. So - just in case it wasnt as dead as it looked - and whilst it was still only a 1' or so wide - it got 2 cans of petrol poured over it and then a container of quick-setting cement and there hasn't been a peep out of it since. Leylandii are also a problem and everyone knows they are - but some antisocial people still deliberately plant them on their ground near neighbours boundaries even so - and there's no legal remedy for solitary leylandii - but several instances of "watering" them with Round-Up deals with the problem and they go brown and die.

it gets worse! These not funny ‘jokes’ masquerading as serious comment and ‘advice’ are becoming dangerous now
CherryBlack
Posts: 422
Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2021 3:47 pm

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by CherryBlack »

Would a systemic weedkiller be the best choice here? https://www.progreen.co.uk/problem/mare-s-horse-tail

Keep working at it, let the treated weeds fully die - give it a good three weeks - and don't dig up until fully brown. Or don't dig it up at all.
Give the systemic weedkiller time to take the chemicals back to its root system.

If you can, you can even spray the leaves you see under the hedge - try and catch as much of it as possible. It will only kill the greenery it actually lands on - it won't affect the soil. That should keep it from encroaching on your boundary.
span
Posts: 1951
Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2010 1:34 am

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by span »

CherryBlack wrote: Fri Jun 07, 2024 12:23 am Would a systemic weedkiller be the best choice here? https://www.progreen.co.uk/problem/mare-s-horse-tail

Keep working at it, let the treated weeds fully die - give it a good three weeks - and don't dig up until fully brown. Or don't dig it up at all.
Give the systemic weedkiller time to take the chemicals back to its root system.

If you can, you can even spray the leaves you see under the hedge - try and catch as much of it as possible. It will only kill the greenery it actually lands on - it won't affect the soil. That should keep it from encroaching on your boundary.
Marestail has a waxy protective outer coating that makes absorbing weedkiller a problem. Try adding a squirt of dishwashing liquid to it to help adhere and break down that protection.
TumbleWeed
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Apr 23, 2021 2:55 pm

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by TumbleWeed »

Marestail has a waxy protective outer coating that makes absorbing weedkiller a problem. Try adding a squirt of dishwashing liquid to it to help adhere and break down that protection.
[/quote]

This +1

Also a weed burner is very satisfying (tho not terribley green).

OP sometimes it's easier to say you are treating your weeds and offer to do the neighbours too (depending on your assessment of your relationship with them ofcourse).

[Off-topic, my late mum was a botanist and I realise I have absorbed fascinating facts about this plant without ever intending to...but can I remember a PIN when I need to :roll: It will probably out-live humanity!]
alyson
Posts: 109
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2014 1:43 pm
Number of Posts per Page: 10
Number of topics per page: 10
Location: Wales

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by alyson »

The issue with marestail is that it has a high silica content which is what makes it so difficult to kill.
It is a very ancient plant.
arborlad
Posts: 10338
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 6:30 pm
Location: Hertfordshire

Re: Neighbours Marestail Weeds

Post by arborlad »

mr sheen wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 8:32 pm
Eliza wrote: Thu Jun 06, 2024 8:05 pm Neighbours are responsible if they know they have a problem plant and don't take necessary measures to deal with it before it becomes a problem to their neighbours.

I think there are several plants that neighbours are obliged to deal with legally if they happen - though I couldnt say which they are besides Japanese Knotweed and it would need checking on a case-by-case basis. There is always a moral obligation to deal with any troublesome plant anyway.

Moral obligation…who is the morality monitor? Very misleading nonesense

Personally I am in the school of thought of taking "direct action" if need be. When I spotted the dead-looking remnants of a plant on public sector ground near my home I knew there was only two things it could be - Japanese Knotweed or bamboo - and I didnt like the idea of either. So - just in case it wasnt as dead as it looked - and whilst it was still only a 1' or so wide - it got 2 cans of petrol poured over it and then a container of quick-setting cement and there hasn't been a peep out of it since. Leylandii are also a problem and everyone knows they are - but some antisocial people still deliberately plant them on their ground near neighbours boundaries even so - and there's no legal remedy for solitary leylandii - but several instances of "watering" them with Round-Up deals with the problem and they go brown and die.

it gets worse! These not funny ‘jokes’ masquerading as serious comment and ‘advice’ are becoming dangerous now



+1
arborlad

smile...it confuses people
Post Reply